Tag Archives: ferrari

March Data Breach Round-Up

findings shares the top breaches that happened in March 2023

As we move forward, it’s becoming increasingly clear that even large corporations aren’t safe from cyber attacks. From Chick-fil-A and Dole Food Company to Acer and Procter & Gamble, the number of companies that have suffered data breaches continues to grow. Today, I’ll delve into some of the latest confirmed data breaches from March, and examine what they could mean for both these businesses and their customers. With personal data security on the line, it’s time to brace yourself for a rollercoaster ride into the realm of cybercrime!


  1. Attention all Chick-fil-A lovers! Unfortunately, Chick-fil-A has sent a notice to customers about a data security incident that may have involved their personal information. The company has taken measures to prevent unauthorized activity and engaged a national forensics firm to investigate the issue. Based on their investigation, it was discovered that unauthorized parties launched an automated attack against Chick-fil-A’s website and mobile application between December 18, 2022, and February 12, 2023, using account credentials obtained from a third-party source. The information that may have been involved includes name, email address, Chick-fil-A One membership number, mobile pay number, QR code, masked credit/debit card number, and the amount of Chick-fil-A credit on the account, as well as the month and day of the birthday, phone number, and address if saved to the account. Unauthorized parties were only able to view the last four digits of the payment card number. Chick-fil-A recommends affected customers change their password immediately and choose a strong, unique password. 


  1. While we all love fresh produce, it’s important to remember that cybersecurity is vital to ensuring that we can continue to enjoy our favorite fruits and veggies. Fresh produce provider, Dole Food Company, has confirmed that employee information was accessed by threat actors during a February ransomware attack. The number of employees affected was not disclosed, but Dole employs approximately 38,000 people worldwide. The company said the attack was sophisticated, but limited in impact on operations. However, Dole was forced to shut down production plants across North America and was unable to fulfill orders for a week, leading to complaints from customers. In response to the attack, Dole engaged cybersecurity experts and notified law enforcement. The incident has been disclosed in an annual report filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission. The company very nicely explained the damage that a cyber attack can cause a company. In the report they write, “our information technology networks and systems, some of which rely on third-party service providers, may be vulnerable to service disruptions or system failures due to causes including intentional hacking, security breaches, intrusions, malware, denial of service attacks, phishing, or other cybersecurity attacks, as well as natural disasters, catastrophic events, power outages, or human error or malfeasance. If we are unable to prevent or adequately respond to and resolve these disruptions or failures, our operations may be impacted and any unauthorized access to, or acquisition of, customer, employee, or other confidential information could result in adverse consequences such as reputational damage, premature termination or reduction of existing contracts, reduction of operating revenue, remediation costs, ransomware payments, litigation, and/or penalties under various laws and regulations. Our customers could also refuse to continue to do business with us and prematurely terminate or reduce existing contracts, resulting in a significant reduction of our operating revenue.” This further shows that everyone in the supply chain is ultimately affected by cyber attacks. 


  1. The FBI just put the cuffs on the supposed mastermind behind a notorious cybercriminal hub that boasted stolen data from Congress members and countless other individuals. The founder of the BreachForums website, Conor Brian Fitzpatrick, has been arrested and charged with operating a hacking forum and marketplace for cybercriminals. Fitzpatrick, 20, allegedly created BreachForums in March 2022 to buy, sell and trade hacked or stolen data and other contraband, including personally identifying information, bank account details, and social security numbers. According to reports, Fitzpatrick is believed to have played a role as a mediator or intermediary for unlawful deals and personally offered access to legitimate breached databases using a credit-based system run by the online platform. The site’s various sections included “Cracking,” “Leaks,” and “Tutorials.” The FBI and the Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General have conducted a disruption operation that caused BreachForums to go offline. Fitzpatrick’s alleged victims included millions of U.S. citizens and hundreds of U.S. and foreign companies, organizations, and government agencies. Deputy Attorney General Lisa O. Monaco has announced another successful crackdown on the cybercrime underworld, stating that the BreachForums platform – much like its predecessor RaidForums – facilitated the trade of stolen data between hackers and willing buyers. She warns all those involved in shady dealings on the dark web that they should take note: Law enforcement agencies are determined to dismantle these illicit forums and prosecute their administrators in U.S. courts. So if you’re operating in the shadows, you better watch out!


  1. On March 20th, Ferrari confirmed that Ferrari S.p.A., its wholly-owned Italian subsidiary, was recently contacted by a threat actor with a ransom demand related to certain client contact details. Twitter user Troy Hunt shared the breach letter sent to customers. Ferrari writes, “we regret to inform you of a cyber incident at Ferrari, where a threat actor was able to access a limited number of systems in our IT environment.” While the company explains that no no payment information or details of Ferrari cars owned or ordered had been stolen, hackers still accessed customers’ names, addresses, email addresses and telephone numbers. Let’s keep on dreaming about our favorite Italian sports cars and hope that Ferrari’s cybersecurity measures are strengthened to prevent any future incidents.


  1. After suffering at least two other hacking incidents in 2021, Acer, a Taiwanese electronics and computer manufacturer, has allegedly fallen victim to a ransomware attack, and the ransomware group, REvil, is claiming responsibility. The cybercriminals are demanding a staggering $50 million, the highest ransom on record to date. Acer is well-known for its laptops, desktops, and monitors, and employs around 7,000 people worldwide. The investigation is still ongoing, however Acer did confirm it suffered a breach. “We have recently detected an incident of unauthorized access to one of our document servers for repair technicians. While our investigation is ongoing, there is currently no indication that any consumer data was stored on that server,” the company told PCMag in a statement. In another statement made to BleepingComputer, the company explained, “Acer routinely monitors its IT systems, and most cyberattacks are well defensed. Companies like us are constantly under attack, and we have reported recent abnormal situations observed to the relevant law enforcement and data protection authorities in multiple countries. We have been continuously enhancing our cybersecurity infrastructure to protect business continuity and our information integrity.” It’s extremely important that companies continue to stay up to date with cybersecurity regulations and best practices.  


  1. Oh boy, it seems like GoAnywhere just can’t catch a break! This supposedly secure web file transfer solution has been at the center of a string of breaches, and the hits just keep on coming. Let’s take a closer look, shall we?


In early February, Fortra – a company that offers GoAnywhere as a secure managed file transfer (MFT) product – announced that it had identified a zero-day vulnerability in the system. This vulnerability could allow attackers to remotely execute code on vulnerable systems, and it was actively being exploited. The news was first reported by journalist Brian Krebs, and it set off a chain reaction of breaches affecting multiple companies.


One of the latest victims to come forward is Procter & Gamble, a consumer goods company that confirmed it was impacted by the GoAnywhere incident. The company’s GoAnywhere MFT platform was compromised, and an unauthorized third party was able to obtain some information about P&G employees. Fortunately, financial and social security information was not accessed, but some data was stolen. It’s believed that the Clop ransomware gang may be behind the attack, as they previously claimed to have stolen files from over 130 organizations.


And now, Crown Resorts – Australia’s largest gambling and entertainment company – has also fallen victim to the GoAnywhere breaches. Their secure file-sharing server was breached using a zero-day vulnerability, and a ransomware group has claimed to have illegally obtained a limited number of Crown files. Crown Resorts is just the latest in a long list of victims, including CHS, Hatch Bank, Rubrik, the City of Toronto, Hitachi Energy and Saks Fifth Avenue.


It’s safe to say that the GoAnywhere breaches have had a huge impact on multiple industries, and it’s important for companies to take extra precautions when it comes to data security. Stay vigilant, folks!



In recent years, cybercrime has affected not only small businesses but also large corporations. This blog post examined several data breaches that occurred in March 2023, including those affecting Chick-fil-A, Dole Food Company, Ferrari, and Acer. These breaches have impacted the personal information of customers and employees, leading to potential risks such as identity theft and fraud. With these incidents in mind, it is crucial for individuals and companies to prioritize cybersecurity measures and remain vigilant against cyber threats. 



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