Tag Archives: data breach

November Security Breach Round Up

November Security Breaches

Welcome to this month’s edition of our data breach round up, where we unravel the recent cyber threats that have sent shockwaves across industries. In a digital landscape fraught with challenges, our commitment at Findings is to equip you with the knowledge and tools necessary to navigate these turbulent waters.

This month’s featured breaches spotlight the vulnerabilities that transcend sectors, from the technology giant Samsung to the healthcare domain with McLaren Health Care, and even reaching into the retail space with Dollar Tree. Each incident reveals not only the compromise of personal and sensitive data but also the profound implications for privacy, security, and trust in our increasingly interconnected world.

  1. Samsung:

    Samsung has acknowledged a significant data breach affecting its U.K. customer base. The breach, which spanned a year, was first brought to light in a statement to TechCrunch by Chelsea Simpson, a spokesperson for Samsung via a third-party agency. According to Simpson, the breach led to unauthorized access to contact details of some Samsung U.K. e-store customers. The specifics of the breach, including the number of affected customers and the method used by hackers, remain undisclosed.

    In communications with affected customers, Samsung revealed that the breach stemmed from a vulnerability in an unspecified third-party business application. This vulnerability exposed the personal data of customers who made purchases on the Samsung U.K. store from July 2019 to June 2020. The company only discovered the breach on November 13, 2023, over three years after the fact, as detailed in a letter to customers that was shared on X (formerly Twitter).

    The compromised data includes names, phone numbers, postal and email addresses, but Samsung assures that no financial information or passwords were affected. The company has reported the breach to the U.K.’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), where spokesperson Adele Burns confirmed that the regulator is conducting enquiries into the incident.

    This breach marks the third such incident disclosed by Samsung in the past two years. Previous breaches include a September 2022 attack on Samsung’s U.S. systems, with undisclosed customer impact, and a March 2022 breach where Lapsus$ hackers allegedly leaked around 200 gigabytes of Samsung’s confidential data, including source codes and biometric unlock algorithms.

  2. KidSecurity:

    KidSecurity, a popular parental control app, inadvertently exposed user data due to a security oversight. The app, with over a million downloads, tracks children’s locations and activities. Researchers discovered that the app failed to secure its Elasticsearch and Logstash databases, leaving over 300 million records publicly accessible for over a month. This exposed data included 21,000 phone numbers, 31,000 email addresses, and partial credit card information.

    The unprotected data became a target for malicious actors, with indications of a compromise by the ‘Readme’ bot. Cybersecurity expert Bob Diachenko highlighted the severity of this breach, especially considering the app’s focus on children’s safety. The exposure of sensitive information such as contact details and payment information poses serious risks, including identity theft and fraud. KidSecurity had yet to comment on the breach at the time of the report.

  3. McLaren Health Care:

    McLaren Health Care recently informed its patients of a cybersecurity incident affecting its computer systems. The healthcare provider noticed suspicious activity around August 22, 2023, and immediately commenced an investigation with third-party forensic specialists. This inquiry revealed unauthorized access to McLaren’s network between July 28 and August 23, 2023, with potential data acquisition by the unauthorized party.

    A thorough review, completed by October 10, 2023, indicated that sensitive information might have been compromised. The data at risk includes names, Social Security numbers, health insurance details, medical information like diagnoses, physician details, medical records, and Medicare/Medicaid data.

    In response, McLaren has taken steps to secure its network and is reviewing and reinforcing its data protection policies and procedures. They are also offering affected individuals identity theft protection services through IDX, including credit monitoring and a $1,000,000 insurance policy, valid until February 9, 2024.

    McLaren urges individuals to stay vigilant, monitor their financial statements, and report any suspicious activity. For further assistance, IDX is available for inquiries, with representatives knowledgeable about the incident. McLaren emphasizes that, as of now, there is no evidence of misuse of the compromised information.

  4. Staples:

    Staples, a prominent American office supply retailer, recently confirmed a cyberattack that led to significant service disruptions and delivery issues. The company, operating 994 stores across the US and Canada and 40 fulfillment centers, took immediate action to contain the breach and safeguard customer data. The incident came to light following multiple Reddit posts from earlier in the week, reporting issues with Staples’ internal operations. Employees noted problems accessing various systems, including Zendesk, VPN employee portals, and email services. Comments on Reddit from Staples employees expressed surprise and concern, with one stating, “I’ve never seen anything like this in my 20 years with Staples.”

    Unconfirmed reports also suggested that employees were advised against using Microsoft 365’s single sign-on and that call center staff were sent home. Staples confirmed to BleepingComputer that they had to take protective measures against a “cybersecurity risk,” which disrupted their backend processing, product delivery, and customer service communications. Although Staples stores remain open, the company’s online operations, including staples.com, continue to face challenges. A company spokesperson stated that systems are gradually coming back online, but some delays in processing orders are expected. Staples has assured a swift return to normal operations and has posted a similar notice on their website.

    BleepingComputer reported that no ransomware or file encryption was involved in the attack. Staples’ rapid response, including shutting down networks and VPNs, may have prevented the attack from reaching its full potential. The extent of any data theft and the potential consequences, such as ransom demands, remain to be seen. This cyberattack is not Staples’ first brush with cybersecurity issues. In March 2023, Essendant, a Staples-owned distributor, faced a multi-day outage impacting online orders. Furthermore, in September 2020, a data breach at Staples exposed customer and order information due to an unpatched VPN vulnerability.

  5. Dollar Tree:

    Dollar Tree, a notable discount retail chain with stores across the United States and Canada, has been affected by a data breach involving a third-party service provider, Zeroed-In Technologies. This breach has impacted nearly 2 million individuals, specifically targeting Dollar Tree and Family Dollar employees.

    The breach, occurring between August 7 and 8, 2023, was disclosed in a notification to the Maine Attorney General. While the intrusion into Zeroed-In’s systems was confirmed, the exact details of accessed or stolen files remained unclear. Consequently, Zeroed-In conducted a thorough review to identify the compromised information, which included names, dates of birth, and Social Security numbers (SSNs).

    Affected individuals have been notified and offered a twelve-month identity protection and credit monitoring service. In response to inquiries from BleepingComputer, a Family Dollar spokesperson stated, “Zeroed-In is a vendor that we and other companies use. They informed us that they identified a security incident, and they provided notice of the incident to current and former employees.”

    The breach’s impact may extend beyond Dollar Tree and Family Dollar, potentially affecting other Zeroed-In customers, although this has not been confirmed. Zeroed-In has not responded to inquiries about the incident.

    The breach’s magnitude has prompted law firms to investigate the possibility of a class-action lawsuit against Zeroed-In.

  6. General Electric:

    General Electric (GE), a prominent American multinational involved in various industries, is investigating a possible cyberattack and data theft. A hacker known as IntelBroker allegedly breached GE’s development environment, initially attempting to sell access on a hacking forum for $500. After failing to attract buyers, the threat actor claimed to offer both network access and stolen data, including sensitive military and DARPA-related information.

    IntelBroker, recognized for previous high-profile cyberattacks, provided screenshots as evidence of the breach, showing data from GE Aviation’s database on military projects. GE confirmed to BleepingComputer their awareness of these allegations and their ongoing investigation.

    IntelBroker’s past exploits include a breach of the Weee! grocery service and a significant data theft from D.C. Health Link, a healthcare marketplace used by White House and House staff. The D.C. Health Link breach, which led to a congressional hearing, revealed that a misconfigured server had exposed sensitive data online.

  7. HSE:

    Holding Slovenske Elektrarne (HSE), Slovenia’s largest electricity provider, was recently hit by a ransomware attack. Despite this, the company’s power generation remained unaffected. HSE, which accounts for about 60% of Slovenia’s domestic power production, managed to contain the attack within a few days.

    The company’s IT systems and files were encrypted, but operational functions continued normally. HSE informed national cybersecurity authorities and the police, and engaged external experts for mitigation. While no ransom demand has been received yet, the company remains cautious during the cleanup process.

    Unofficial sources attribute the attack to the Rhysida ransomware gang, known for high-profile attacks without immediate ransom demands. The breach might have occurred through stolen passwords from unprotected cloud storage, although this has not been confirmed. Rhysida has been active since May 2023 and is notorious for targeting various organizations internationally. HSE is yet to issue a formal response to these allegations.

The array of cyberattacks faced by the companies above demonstrate the complexity and severity of the cybersecurity landscape. These incidents serve as stark reminders of the persistent threats in the digital domain, urging organizations to fortify their defenses and adopt more robust data protection measures. As the aftermath of these breaches unfolds, it is imperative for companies to not only address the immediate security gaps but also to engage in proactive measures to safeguard against future threats. Furthermore, these events underscore the need for ongoing vigilance, transparency, and collaboration among businesses, regulatory bodies, and cybersecurity experts to enhance the resilience of our digital ecosystem against such pervasive and evolving threats.

Cybersecurity Under Fire: Top October 2023 Breaches

October security breach round up - findings.co

The digital world is full of cyber threats that can affect any industry, and recent incidents have shown that even the most secure systems can be vulnerable. For example, Okta recently admitted to a security breach. Below you will also read about a sophisticated campaign called Magecart that stole credit card details by exploiting webpages. The impact of these breaches can be seen in various industries. For instance, five Canadian hospitals experienced disruptions in their services, and genetic testing company 23andMe had their data compromised. Even businesses in the hospitality and retail sectors are not safe, as shown by the data breach at Marina Bay Sands and Casio’s apology to its users. October’s breaches emphasize the importance of taking swift action and being transparent. As companies navigate through these challenges, it is crucial to strengthen cybersecurity measures and ensure the integrity of customer data.

  1. Okta

Okta has expressed regret to its customers for a recent security breach, emphasizing its dedication to maintaining transparent communication with them. On October 19, Okta notified its customers about a security breach that occurred between September 28 and October 17, wherein unauthorized access was gained to the support system affecting files related to 134 customers, which is under 1% of Okta’s customer base. HAR files containing session tokens were accessed, which led to session hijacking for 5 customers, with 3 customers openly discussing their experiences. The breach was enabled through the misuse of a service account within the customer support system. This service account had been inadvertently synced with an employee’s personal Google account, potentially through the compromise of the employee’s personal Google account or device.

Okta faced challenges in detecting the breach due to the difference in log events when files were accessed directly rather than through case files, which was the method used by the threat actor. Upon receiving a suspicious IP address from BeyondTrust on October 13, Okta could trace and shut down the unauthorized access, revoke the stolen session tokens, and notify affected customers.

  1. 23andMe

23andMe, a genetic testing company, has reported unauthorized access to customer data. The incident did not result from a system breach, but from attackers who managed to guess user login details and subsequently scrape information from the “DNA Relatives” feature. This feature allows users to voluntarily share their genetic information to connect with relatives. A sample of the compromised data, affecting at least one million data points related to Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry and hundreds of thousands concerning individuals of Chinese descent, was put up for sale online. The available data includes personal identifiers and ancestry details, though not the raw genetic data.

The company has advised users to secure their accounts with strong, unique passwords and to enable two-factor authentication. They are still in the process of validating the leaked data, which includes profiles of public figures like Mark Zuckerberg, Elon Musk, and Sergey Brin. However, the legitimacy of this particular data remains unconfirmed, as there are inconsistencies, such as Musk and Brin having identical profile information in the leaked dataset.

The situation underscores the dangers of data breaches, especially with sensitive genetic information, and highlights the continuing issue of “credential stuffing”—where hackers use leaked login details from one breach to access accounts on other platforms. The motive behind targeting data related to Ashkenazi Jews and the extent of additional compromised data are yet to be fully understood. This breach raises significant concerns about the privacy and security risks associated with DNA databases and similar platforms that facilitate the sharing of personal data.

  1. Marina Bay Sands

Marina Bay Sands has reported a data breach affecting approximately 665,000 members of its non-casino rewards program. The breach, which occurred on October 19-20, 2023, involved unauthorized access to customer data, including names, email addresses, phone numbers, countries of residence, and membership details. There is no indication that the casino rewards program was compromised or that the data has been misused. The company has apologized, initiated an investigation with cybersecurity experts, and is contacting affected customers. Authorities have been notified, and measures are being taken to enhance data security.

  1. Casio

Casio Computer Co., Ltd. has recently extended an apology to its users following a security breach that compromised personal data on its educational web application, ClassPad.net on October 11. The breach came to light when a database malfunction was noticed within the development environment for ClassPad.net. Further investigation revealed that this issue was not isolated but part of a larger intrusion that occurred the following evening, leading to the compromise of data belonging to users from various countries.

It was determined that the breach occurred due to deactivated network security protocols within the development system, compounded by a lack of rigorous operational oversight. To address the breach, Casio has temporarily disabled the affected development databases to block any further unauthorized access and has been proactive in contacting the appropriate Japanese data protection authorities. The company is currently consulting with cybersecurity and legal experts to conduct an in-depth investigation and take appropriate measures, as well as cooperating with the police in their investigation.

The types of personal information accessed included customer names, email addresses, countries of residence, purchasing history, and usage details for the service. Casio has confirmed that credit card information was not retained in the database and therefore not at risk. The incident impacted data related to 91,921 Japanese customers, including individuals and educational institutions, along with 35,049 international customers spanning 148 countries.

Casio reiterates its deep regret for the breach and the resulting impact on its customers, pledging a steadfast effort to bolster its security systems to prevent such occurrences in the future.

  1. D-Link

D-Link Corporation faced an alleged data breach after an unauthorized third party claimed on an online forum that they had stolen data. D-Link responded quickly, initiating an investigation and implementing precautionary measures. Their findings, supported by external experts from Trend Micro, indicated that the claim was largely exaggerated and misleading. The data in question was traced back to an obsolete D-View 6 system, decommissioned since 2015, and used for product registration. It did not include user IDs or financial details but contained some low-sensitivity information like contact names and office email addresses.

The breach is thought to have originated from a phishing attack that an employee inadvertently fell victim to, which led to the exposure of the outdated data. D-Link has reviewed its security measures and shut down the servers suspected to be involved, as well as disconnected the test lab from their network. The company reassures that the security systems meet the standards of the time and that they are committed to enhancing their security to prevent future incidents.

In summary, D-Link’s prompt response to the alleged data breach led to findings that contradicted the severity of the online claim. Measures have been taken to safeguard against similar occurrences, and customers have been advised on how to protect their information.

  1. Online stores’ 404 pages stolen

The Akamai Security Intelligence Group has uncovered a novel Magecart web skimming campaign that’s infiltrating a broad range of websites, including those belonging to major players in the food and retail sectors. This particular campaign is notable for its innovative use of three advanced techniques to hide its malicious code, one of which involves exploiting the default 404 error pages of websites—a method previously unseen.

The campaign’s method of operation begins with the injection of a small piece of obfuscated JavaScript, known as a loader, into the website. This loader is responsible for setting up the full malicious attack by initiating a WebSocket channel for communication with the attackers’ command and control server. The attackers then deploy the main skimming code that targets sensitive pages, such as checkout pages, to steal personal and credit card information from unsuspecting users.

Three variations of the campaign have been identified, each showcasing the evolution of the attackers’ methods to evade detection. The first variation uses an image tag with a malformed source attribute to execute JavaScript, while the second mimics legitimate services like Facebook’s Meta Pixel to blend in. The third and most sophisticated variation involves inserting the skimmer within the HTML of the website’s 404 error page, making it extremely difficult to detect and remove. This third variation also employs a different tactic for data exfiltration, using a fake form that overlays the legitimate payment form. This technique captures the user’s data twice—once through the fake form and then again when the user is prompted to re-enter the information on the real form.

The Akamai team tested their Client-Side Protection & Compliance solution against this skimmer and found that it successfully detected and alerted them to the high-severity threat. This case serves as a critical reminder of the importance of advanced security measures to combat the increasingly sophisticated techniques used in web skimming attacks. This emphasizes the importance of vigilance and the adoption of advanced security measures for organizations to protect against these evolving threats. Additionally, it’s a call to action for companies to monitor their websites actively and to consider client-side protection solutions that can detect and mitigate such attacks in real time.

  1. Air Europa

Air Europa, a Spanish airline headquartered in Madrid, is currently in the process of being acquired by International Consolidated Airlines Group, which owns British Airways. The airline has experienced a cyberattack targeting its online payment system, which resulted in some customers’ credit card details being compromised, as reported by the company. The airline has responded by contacting those customers whose information was potentially exposed and has informed the appropriate financial entities about the breach. The exact number of customers impacted and the financial repercussions of the incident have not been disclosed by Air Europa, and they stated that no other personal information was at risk. 

In a previous incident in 2018, which affected 489,000 customers, Air Europa faced penalties for not reporting the breach within the mandated 72-hour period, taking 41 days instead. This past breach was highlighted by the OCU, emphasizing the airline’s obligation to timely report such incidents.


  1. TransForm

A cyberattack on TransForm, a shared service provider, has disrupted operations across five hospitals in the Erie St. Clair region of Ontario, Canada. This attack led to system outages, affecting patient care and resulting in the rescheduling of appointments. TransForm, established by these hospitals to handle IT, supply chain, and accounts payable, acknowledged the cyberattack in a statement and indicated an ongoing investigation to ascertain the attack’s cause and reach. It is currently unclear whether patient information has been compromised.

The affected hospitals include:

  • Windsor Regional Hospital: A major healthcare facility with 642 beds.

  • Hotel Dieu Grace: Specializes in complex care, mental health, and rehabilitation with 313 beds.

  • Erie Shores Healthcare: A significant provider with 72 beds.

  • Hospice of Windsor-Essex: Offers end-of-life care with 23 beds.

  • Chatham-Kent Health Alliance: A community hospital with a 200-bed capacity.

Patients with upcoming appointments at these hospitals are being contacted for rescheduling. Meanwhile, the hospitals have advised individuals not requiring emergency care to seek alternatives such as primary care providers or local clinics to lessen the burden on hospital resources during this period.

As the specifics of the cyberattack are still under review, past patients of these institutions are encouraged to be vigilant, particularly regarding unsolicited communications that may be suspicious.

It’s clear that no entity, regardless of size or industry, is immune to the threat of digital incursions. The essential lesson here is not found in the recounting of breaches but in understanding the dynamic and persistent nature of cyber risks. To navigate this complex landscape, companies must adopt a posture of continuous monitoring and regular security assessments to stay ahead of threats. Utilizing automated tools for real-time analysis and proactive threat intelligence is no longer optional but a critical component of modern cybersecurity strategies. These practices, combined with a culture of security awareness and training, can form a robust defense against a tide of evolving digital dangers. As businesses forge ahead, the integration of advanced cybersecurity measures will be the beacon that guides them through the murky waters of potential cyberattacks, ensuring resilience and trust in the digital era.



Top Cyber Attacks and Data Breaches: May 2023 Round Up

May 2023 data breaches

In an era dominated by digital connectivity, the frequency and impact of data breaches continue to escalate, leaving individuals and organizations vulnerable to devastating consequences. From state-sponsored hacking campaigns to opportunistic cybercriminals, the realm of data security is constantly under siege. Recent events have once again thrust data breaches into the spotlight, as major corporations and industry giants grapple with the aftermath of malicious intrusions. In this blog post, I will delve into a series of alarming incidents that have unfolded in May 2023, shedding light on the tactics employed, the extent of compromised information, and the potential ramifications for affected individuals and businesses. Brace yourself for an eye-opening exploration of the evolving threat landscape as we navigate the treacherous waters of data breaches and their far-reaching impact.

 

  1. On May 24,2023, Microsoft reported that it found targeted malicious activity by Volt Typhoon, a state-sponsored group from China, aiming to access unauthorized credentials and explore critical infrastructure networks in the US. This campaign supposedly  intends to disrupt communication infrastructure between the US and Asia during future crises. Volt Typhoon has been active since mid-2021, primarily targeting critical infrastructure organizations in Guam and other US regions across various sectors. They employ stealth techniques, living-off-the-land methods, and manipulate systems using command line instructions. The threat actor maintains persistent access and attempts to conceal their activities by routing network traffic through compromised SOHO network equipment. 

 
  1. Sysco, a major U.S. multinational food distribution corporation, recently revealed that approximately 126,243 current and former employees may have had their sensitive data accessed and acquired in a cyberattack that took place in January. According to notification letters sent to affected individuals, Sysco’s systems were initially breached on January 14, but the intrusion was only discovered nearly two months later. The company assured that its operational systems, business functions, and customer services remained unaffected by the breach. While specific details about the data accessed for each individual are yet to be confirmed, Sysco stated that the compromised information may include personal data provided for payroll purposes, such as names, Social Security numbers, account numbers, or similar information. 

 
  1. On May 26, 2023, Managed Care of North America (MCNA) Dental published a data breach notification on its website, informing approximately 9 million patients that their personal data was compromised. MCNA Dental is one of the largest government-sponsored (Medicaid and CHIP) dental care and oral health insurance providers in the U.S. On March 6, 2023, the insurance provider discovered unauthorized activity in their computer system. They took immediate action to halt the activity and initiated an investigation with the assistance of a specialized team. It was determined that an unauthorized user was able to access and make copies of certain information between February 26, 2023, and March 7, 2023. The potentially compromised information includes contact details such as first and last name, address, date of birth, phone number, and email address. Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers or other government-issued ID numbers were also accessed. Additionally, health insurance information such as plan details, insurance company information, member numbers, and Medicaid-Medicare ID numbers may have been involved. Specific information related to dental care, including visits, dentist and doctor names, past treatments, x-rays/photos, prescribed medicines, and treatment details, as well as bills and insurance claims, were also potentially exposed. 

 
  1. NextGen Healthcare, a vendor of cloud-based electronic health records, has been informing over 1 million individuals about a data compromise that involves the unauthorized acquisition of login credentials. This incident marks at least the second alleged data security breach that the company has probed since January. The company explained an unknown third-party gained unauthorized access to a limited set of personal data between March 29, 2023, and April 14, 2023. The accessed information includes names, dates of birth, addresses, and social security numbers. Out of the 198 significant breaches of health data that have been reported on the Department of Health and Human Services’ HIPAA Breach Reporting Tool website in 2023, impacting a total of 17.4 million individuals, it has been disclosed that at least 75 of these incidents affecting 9.8 million individuals were reported to involve business associates. Approximately 38% of the major health data breaches reported on the HIPAA Breach Reporting Tool website in 2023 involved vendors and other business associates. Interestingly, despite accounting for a smaller proportion of breaches, these incidents were responsible for impacting 56% of the individuals affected by breaches in the healthcare sector.

 
  1. Luxottica, the world’s largest eyewear company known for brands like Ray-Ban, Oakley, and Chanel, has officially confirmed a data breach that occurred in 2021 via BleepingComputer. The breach exposed the personal information of approximately 70 million customers when a database was recently made available for free on hacking forums. Luxottica revealed that one of its partners experienced the breach, involving a security incident that affected a third-party contractor responsible for holding customer data. The exposed data includes sensitive details such as full customer names, email addresses, phone numbers, residential addresses, and dates of birth. Luxottica emphasized that financial information, social security numbers, login credentials, and other critical data that could endanger customer safety were not compromised. The FBI has made an arrest in connection with the incident, resulting in the shutdown of the website where the data was published. 

 
  1. On May 11, 2023, Brightly informed present and past SchoolDude users that a security incident occurred. SchoolDude is an online platform used by educational institutions for placing and tracking maintenance work orders. Information such as name, email address, account password, phone number, and school district name were potentially breached. 

 
  1. On May 8, 2023, Dragos, a company specializing in industrial cybersecurity, experienced a failed extortion scheme by a cybercriminal group. The group gained unauthorized access by compromising the personal email of a new sales employee, allowing them to impersonate a Dragos employee and access resources in SharePoint and the contract management system. Although they accessed a report with customer IP addresses, Dragos’ security controls prevented the threat actor from deploying ransomware or making further infrastructure changes. The cybercriminals resorted to extortion attempts, escalating their messages and contacting Dragos executives and known contacts. However, Dragos chose not to engage with the criminals and promptly activated their incident response retainer and involved their third-party MDR provider. The investigation is ongoing, but Dragos has implemented additional verification steps for their onboarding process and emphasizes identity and access management, multi-factor authentication, continuous monitoring, and incident response preparedness.

 

In other news, in May, it was discovered that Apple banned its employees from using generative AI tools like OpenAI’s ChatGPT and GitHub’s Copilot due to concerns about potential data leaks and disclosure of sensitive information. Apple’s decision is based on the fact that OpenAI stores all user interactions by default, including conversations with ChatGPT, which are used for training and subject to moderation. While OpenAI introduced an option to disable chat history, conversations are retained for 30 days for abuse review before permanent deletion. Apple worries that employees may unintentionally reveal confidential project information within ChatGPT, which could be accessed by OpenAI moderators. Similar restrictions have been implemented by other companies like JP Morgan, Verizon, and Amazon. Despite the ban, OpenAI recently launched an iOS app for ChatGPT, making Apple’s decision notable, considering the app’s availability and future expansion plans. 

 

As data breaches continue to make headlines, it becomes abundantly clear that the protection of sensitive information is of paramount importance. The incidents highlighted in this blog post serve as a stark reminder that no individual or organization is immune to the persistent and ever-evolving threats posed by cybercriminals. As we move forward, it is imperative for individuals and businesses alike to prioritize robust security measures, including stringent access controls, advanced encryption protocols, and employee education programs. By staying vigilant, proactive, and informed, companies can fortify their defenses and mitigate the risks associated with data breaches. 

 



December Security Breach Round Up

December security breaches

2023 is here and while I would love nothing more than to say that everything is awesome in the security world, I would be lying to all of you if I said there were no data breaches in the month of December. 

While most people usually wind down and enjoy the holiday season with family in December, the top dogs at the companies below probably had nothing but stress on their minds. 

Let’s dig in and see what mistakes were uncovered this month.


  1. LastPass:

Well this is a little awkward, isn’t it? Given that LastPass is a password manager, one would think that they would have strong measures in place to protect their consumer’s privacy; however, that does not seem to be the case. In a company notice, LastPass writes: “we recently notified you that an unauthorized party gained access to a third-party cloud-based storage service, which LastPass uses to store archived backups of our production data.” The threat actor copied information from a backup source that contained basic customer account information and related metadata including company names, end-user names, billing addresses, email addresses, telephone numbers, and the IP addresses from which customers were accessing the LastPass service. The company continues to explain that “the threat actor was also able to copy a backup of customer vault data from the encrypted storage container which is stored in a proprietary binary format that contains both unencrypted data, such as website URLs, as well as fully-encrypted sensitive fields such as website usernames and passwords, secure notes, and form-filled data. These encrypted fields remain secured with 256-bit AES encryption and can only be decrypted with a unique encryption key derived from each user’s master password using our Zero Knowledge architecture. As a reminder, the master password is never known to LastPass and is not stored or maintained by LastPass.” It is important to note that many organizations and their employees use LastPass to store passwords. If you were not aware of this incident, it is time you look into protecting your accounts and changing your passwords.


  1. Uber:

When I found out about yet ANOTHER Uber breach, my reaction was a deep sigh of frustration. This time the breach resulted from a compromised third-party vendor. BleepingComputer reported about the incident and shared that “a threat actor named ‘UberLeaks’ began leaking data they claimed was stolen from Uber and Uber Eats on a hacking forum known for publishing data breaches. One of the documents seen by BleepingComputer includes email addresses and Windows Active Directory information for over 77,000 Uber employees. While BleepingComputer initially thought this data was stolen during the September attack, Uber told BleepingComputer it believes it is related to a security breach on a third-party vendor.” After further investigations, Uber later shared with BleepingComputer that the threat actor stole its data in a recent breach on Teqtivity, which Uber uses for asset management and tracking services. Teqtivity informed that the threat actor was able to access device information such as serial number, make, models, and technical specs. Additionally, user information such as first name, last name, work email address, and work location details were accessed. 


  1. Five Guys:

I’ll be the first to admit that Five Guys is irresistible – especially on a cheat day. So of course I hate to be the bearer of bad news here, but alas, it has to be said. On December 29, 2022, Five Guys released a statement confirming a breach that occurred in September 2022 that exposed sensitive customer data by an unauthorized party who accessed a file server. The company writes: “The investigation identified unauthorized access to files on our file server that occurred on September 17, 2022. We conducted a careful review of those files and, on December 8, 2022, determined that the files contained information submitted to us in connection with the employment process.” Stolen data would include employee personally identifiable information (PII) such as names, social security numbers and driver’s license numbers. We see this time and time again where threat actors access sensitive information and companies do not inform victims until months later. In those months, the attackers can commit identity and credit fraud and sell user data on the dark web. That is one of the reasons why Findings is so useful – we continuously monitor your systems and the dark web to make sure that if an incident like this does ever occur, it will not take you months to find out.

 

  1. Sequoia:

For those who are unaware, Sequoia is a popular benefits and payroll management company. In a company notice, they stated: “Sequoia Benefits and Insurance Services LLC (“Company”) recently became aware that an unauthorized party may have accessed a cloud storage system that contained personal information provided in connection with the Company’s services to its clients, including your employer or, if you are a dependent, your family member’s employer.” Information accessed by the unauthorized party consists of personal information including demographic information such as name, address, date of birth, gender, marital status, employment status, social security number, work email address, member ID, wage data for benefits, attachments that may have been provided for advocate services, ID cards, and any COVID test results or vaccine card that may have been uploaded.

  1. Social Blade:

Social Blade is an analytics platform that provides statistical data for numerous social sites such as YouTube, Twitter, Twitch and Instagram. They confirmed that they suffered a data breach after their database was breached and put up for sale on a hacking forum. Social Blade monitors tens of millions of social media accounts and the hacker claims to have obtained 5.6 million records. The sample data that was posted by the hacker also suggests that many of the records contain user information. Users online were quick to share an email that was apparently sent privately to affected users. In the email, Social Blade confirms the breach and reports that the affected data includes email addresses, IP addresses, password hashes, client IDs and tokens for business API users, and authentication tokens for connected accounts. Other non-personal and internal data was also compromised. Roughly 0.1% of users also had their addresses leaked, but credit card information was not exposed. A similarity we see here in comparison to other breaches is that this was not Social Blade’s first breach. In 2016, the company also confirmed that it suffered a breach. Let’s see if the most recent breach will be the push they need to better protect their company and prevent future attacks. 

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source: twitter

Now that we are in 2023, we hope that companies will take the necessary steps to protect their systems. Findings has a few New Year’s resolutions we recommend companies take on to ensure that they are protecting their employees and consumers.

Attackers prey on those who don’t regularly change their passwords. In fact, it makes their jobs easier. Make sure your systems are secure with New Year’s Resolution # 1: Require your employees to change their passwords every 90 days.

With an increase in cyber attacks being committed against supply chains, it’s vital that every business implements mandatory cybersecurity training programs. Having employees that are aware of all things cyber security is beneficial in minimizing the risks associated with cyber attacks.

Staying vigilant and continuously assessing potential risks in your supply chain is an essential New Year’s Resolution that companies need to follow in 2023.

Updates are usually required for a reason, and many times it’s for security reasons. When systems are up to date, it makes it harder for hackers to attack and find loopholes in the system. 

If you haven’t heard of our continuous monitoring solution, you may want to consider looking into it.

Andddd that’s a wrap for this month!


Findings wishes you all a happy and healthy New Year.

 

We’re here for you. Learn more today.

November Security Breach Round Up

November Security Breaches

From grocery stores, to banks, and everything in between – November saw it all when it came to breaches. As I mentioned in September, hackers are not picky. Let’s just say, when an opportunity arises, they will swoop right in and overtake your systems and access any data they can get their e-hands on.

 

Be careful, and keep staying informed – our goal is to make sure no company ends up on this list next month. 

 

Let’s dive in. 

 

  1. WhatsApp


Whatsapp with this?! The app that we all know, love, and use, WhatsApp, has supposedly fallen victim to a massive data leak. And by massive, I mean nearly 500 million user records have been leaked online. So… what happened? On November 16, 2022, an ad on a well-known hacking community forum was posted by someone claiming to be selling a 2022 database of WhatsApp user mobile numbers. It is also claimed that 32 million users from the United States have been included. Although only phone numbers were leaked, it is important to note that leaked phone numbers are typically used for marketing purposes, phishing, impersonation, and fraud. 

 

  1. Bed Bath & Beyond

Ah, phishing at its finest. While almost anyone who enters Bed Bath & Beyond can get lost for hours browsing, no one likes hearing about breached data. The United States retail giant confirmed that unauthorized access to company data was accessed after an employee was phished. In an 8-K filing to the U.S Securities and Exchange Commission, Bed Bath & Beyond explained that data of the employee’s hard drive and other shared drives that the employee had access to were accessed. The company is still investigating whether the drives have any sensitive or personally identifiable information.

 

  1. DropBox


File hosting service, DropBox, also fell victim to a phishing incident. In a statement from the company, they explained the situation saying “We were recently the target of a phishing campaign that successfully accessed some of the code we store in GitHub. No one’s content, passwords, or payment information was accessed, and the issue was quickly resolved. Our core apps and infrastructure were also unaffected, as access to this code is even more limited and strictly controlled. We believe the risk to customers is minimal. Because we take our commitment to security, privacy, and transparency seriously, we have notified those affected.” The company goes on to explain that on October 14, GitHub alerted them that suspicious behavior was going on. DropBox found that a threat actor was pretending to be CircleCI and was able to access one of DropBox’s GitHub accounts. To date, their investigation has found that the code accessed by the threat actor contained some credentials, primarily, API keys used by Dropbox developers.

 

  1. TransUnion


Isn’t it ironic how an agency who determines your credit score, is the one that could be ruining your credit? There are three main credit bureaus in America – Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. Unfortunately, the consumer credit reporting agency, TransUnion, experienced a breach and began notifying individuals about the incident on November 7,2022. The company collects and assembles information on over 1 billion consumers worldwide, 200 million of those being Americans. The type of information that was exposed includes names, social security numbers, driver’s license numbers, and account numbers. 

 

  1. AirAsia


AirAsia, the largest airline in Malaysia with approximately 22,000 employees and worldwide operations, has unfortunately fallen victim to a supposed ransomware attack. The group behind this attack is known as the Daixin Ransomware Gang and they have supposedly stolen data of 5 million AirAsia passengers and employees. The Daixin team is known for disrupting operations with ransomware and stealing personally identifiable information. With this data, the cyber threat group threatens to release the stolen information unless a ransom is paid. In a tweet shared by Soufiane Tahiri, screenshots from the group can be seen that were posted on the dark web. The information applies to both employees and passengers. In these documents, information such as date of birth, country of birth, where the person is from, start of employment for employees and their secret question and answer used to secure their accounts could be found. 

 

  1. Sonder


In a company security update, Sonder, a hospitality company, notified the public that they became aware of unauthorized access to one of its systems that included guest records. Information that was accessed includes: 

  • Sonder.com username and encrypted password

  • Full name, phone number, date of birth, address, and email address

  • Certain guest transaction receipts, including the last 4 digits of credit card numbers and transaction amounts

  • Dates booked for stays at a Sonder property

  • Government issued identification such as driver’s licenses or passports

 

  1. Sobeys

This incident shows that ANY business can get breached. Even a supermarket. Incase you aren’t familiar, Sobeys is one of the two national grocery retailers in Canada. On November 7, 2022, Sobeys’ parent company wrote in a notice that the grocery stores were impacted by an IT systems issue. While the company hasn’t publicly confirmed a cyber attack on its systems, a local media outlet reported that “two provincial privacy watchdogs said they had received data breach reports from Sobeys. Both Quebec’s access to information commission and Alberta’s privacy commission have both been notified by the grocer about a “confidentiality incident.” 

 

  1. Whoosh

Russian scooter sharing company known as Whoosh has confirmed that it too was breached. Hackers started to sell a database containing the details of 7.2 million customers on a hacking forum. Alleged stolen data on the hacking forum allegedly contains promotion codes that would allow someone to access the service for free, as well as partial user identification and payment card data. Included were email addresses, phone numbers, and first names. A russian news outlet, RIA Novosti was told by Whoosh that, “The leak of some of the personal data of customers of the Russian scooter rental service Whoosh at the beginning of November did indeed occur, but did not affect sensitive user data, such as access to accounts, transaction information or travel details” 

 

  1. Coinsquare:


Cryptocurrency is a sexy industry to talk about, but this incident is a little less appealing. To round up the month, a Canadian cryptocurrency exchange, Coinsquare has become the latest victim of a security breach. Data such as customer names, email addresses, residential addresses, phone numbers, dates of birth, device IDs, public wallet addresses, transaction history, and account balances were compromised. According to customer reports, Coinsquare allegedly contacted them via email and let them know that it had identified an intrusion and a database containing personal information accessed by an unintended third party. In a Tweet responding to an account sharing about the hack, Coinsquare wrote, “We have no evidence any of this information was viewed by the bad actor, but in an abundance of caution, we wanted to make our users aware. We notified all clients, but only identified 3 clients whose accounts were accessed.” 



Companies can get careless when it comes to securing their systems, their employees, and their customers. And while we are here to help you, the first step begins with you staying informed. Which we see you are since you made it this far! 


We’re here to help you. Contact us today

October Security Breach Round Up

October security breach round up - findings.co

October was Cyber Security Awareness Month, and yet, another month, another breach. In a month that is geared towards helping organizations protect themselves, large companies have yet again fallen victim to these heinous attacks. One after the other, many companies and their consumers are now wondering when these breaches will stop. 

 

Here are our top October 2022 know-worthy incidents:

 

Toyota:

    • Toyota is no stranger to data breaches. And by the looks of it, it seems as though the company hasn’t learned from past mistakes (remember the 2019 breach that affected over 3 million of Toyota’s customers?). On October 7, 2022, Toyota issued an apology after nearly 300,000 people who used T-Connect, a telematics service that connects vehicles via a network, were exposed. The Japanese car giant explained that personal data was leaked when an access key was publicly made available on GitHub for almost five years. Email addresses and customer control numbers may have been exposed since 2017.


Microsoft:

    • Another tech giant hit yet again. On October 19, 2022, Microsoft addressed the public after security researchers at SOCRadar informed Microsoft of a misconfigured Microsoft endpoint. After the discovery, Microsoft explained that the researchers exaggerated the entire situation. This misconfiguration resulted in the potential for unauthenticated access to some business transaction data corresponding to interactions between Microsoft and prospective customers. Information about planning or potential implementation and provisioning of Microsoft services was involved. In addition, the data that was potentially compromised includes names, email addresses, email content, company name, and phone numbers, and may have included attached files relating to business between a customer and Microsoft or an authorized Microsoft partner. 


Verizon:

    • In a notice, the company confirms, “we determined that between October 6 and October 10, 2022, a third party actor accessed the last four digits of the credit card used to make automatic payments on your account. Using the last four digits of that credit card, the third party was able to gain access to your Verizon account and may have processed an unauthorized SIM card change on the prepaid line that received the SMS linking to this notice.” 


Carousell:

    • On October 14, Carousell Singapore disclosed that it experienced a breach. And this wasn’t a small breach either – almost 2 million accounts were compromised. The company explains, “it is unlikely that this incident will result in an identity theft as it does not include information like your NRIC number,” but it is believed that emails were compromised. 


Medibank:

    • Bad news for Medibank, one of the largest Australian private health insurance providers. On October 12, 2022 the company discovered that customer information may have been compromised after a hack on their systems. It was thought that the original hack only affected certain customers, but after this week, the company is assuming that all 3.9 million customers were affected. The company said it had received a series of files from the alleged hacker, and they found the files included 100 ahm policy records, which include personal and health claims data, plus another 1,000 policy records from ahm, and files which contain some Medibank, ahm and international student customer data. The records provided to the company include names, addresses, dates of birth, Medicare numbers, phone numbers and medical claims data, including information about diagnosis, procedures and location of medical services.


Twilio:

    • Sometimes companies just can’t catch a break. Cloud communications company, Twilio, disclosed a new data breach stemming from a June 2022 security incident. After a lengthy investigation, the company concluded that 209 customers and 93 Authy end users had accounts that were impacted by the incident. 

 

Don’t let your company end up on this list. See how findings can help you here.

September Security Breach Round Up

September Security Breach Round Up. An iPhone with a broken lock - signifying a breach.

Cybersecurity threats have become an integrated part of every company’s lifecycle. They are occurring now more than ever, and hackers are not selective – ultimately putting any company at risk for an attack. 

 

To keep your company safe and your cybersecurity team up to date with the latest trends, it’s important to learn from recent incidents to avoid the same mistakes that left even the world’s largest corporations exposed. 

 

Here are our top 5 September 2022 read-worthy incidents:

 

Uber:

Sneaking out of the house isn’t the only thing teens are getting good at and a recent breach proves this. On September 15, 2022, Uber fell victim to an attack. In this case, a suspected teen hacker, who Uber believes is a part of Lapsus$, was able to access Uber’s systems. In a company notice, Uber explains that the hacker likely purchased an Uber EXT contractor’s password off the dark web, and after many attempts, was successfully able to access this worker’s account. Several internal systems, internal slack messages, information from an internal tool the company uses to manage invoices, and their dashboard at HackerOne were all accessed. 


Samsung:

Most would think that one of the world’s biggest tech companies is heavily secure, right? Well… On September 2, 2022, Samsung confirmed a cybersecurity incident that affected customer data. Information such as name, contact and demographic information, date of birth, and product registration information may have been compromised. After further investigation, Samsung discovered that this incident stemmed from an unauthorized third party acquiring information from some of Samsung’s U.S. systems. 


Optus:

Optus, one of Australia’s largest telecommunication companies, suffered a cyberattack and confirmed it on September 22, 2022, through a company announcement. Customer names, dates of birth, phone numbers, email addresses, street addresses, medicare cards, and ID document numbers such as driver’s license and passport numbers of over 9 million people were potentially exposed.


American Airlines (Again?! Really?!):

On September 16, 2022, American Airlines informed customers that they experienced a security incident in July 2022. The notice explains the discovery of an unauthorized actor who compromised the email accounts of a limited number of American Airlines employees. Upon further investigation, they found that personal information such as name, date of birth, mailing address, phone number, email address, driver’s license number, passport number, and/or certain medical information were accessible through  the email accounts. 


Tap Air Portugal:

As aviation becomes a hot target, TAP Air Portugal released an important notice to customers on September 21, 2022, regarding a cyber attack discovered back in August. The notice reads, “Regretfully, we want to inform that the following categories of personal data from some customers of TAP have been disclosed: name, nationality, gender, date of birth, address, email, telephone contact, customer registration date and frequent flyer number. The information for each affected customer may vary. We are releasing this notice to make customers aware of this matter. There is no indication that payment data was exfiltrated from TAP’s network.” While the company did not disclose how many people were affected, it is believed that over 1.5 million TAP customers had their data stolen. 


While we’ve only listed 5 of the many incidents that occurred in September, it’s important to mention that breaches occur all the time, and hackers are getting more and more creative and sophisticated. 


As businesses, it’s even more important for you to find ways to prevent, detect, and respond to these attacks in a quick and effective manner. 


Keeping your supply chain secure is vital to keeping it functioning properly and that’s why we’ve put together a supply chain security enhancement checklist for companies to reference. 

 

 

                                                                      At Findings, we help secure your digital supply chain. Discover how we can benefit your business here.

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