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Category Archives: iso27017

A CISO’s VDP Security Roadmap, Step-by-Step

Findings-VDP Roadmap

When it comes to cybersecurity, discovering vulnerabilities is often the easy part. What tends to be challenging is figuring out where to disclose vulnerabilities once you’ve discovered them.

If someone inside your business or supply chain discovers a vulnerability but fails to report it to the people who need to know about it, the vulnerability may as well not have been discovered at all. It’s only by disclosing and reporting vulnerabilities that stakeholders can remediate them, while also taking steps to avoid falling victim to them until their root cause is addressed.

That’s why establishing vulnerability disclosure programs and policies is critical to cybersecurity success – not to mention the overall health of your business. Setting up a VDP places you ahead of competitors who lack one. It also sends a clear message to vendors, customers, partners, employees and other stakeholders that you take cybersecurity seriously and operate with transparency when you discover vulnerabilities. And it establishes clear policies, robust communication channels and backend processes that help you resolve vulnerabilities and risks quickly.

 

 

But how do you actually create a security VDP initiative? What goes into a VDP, and how do you ensure your VDP application covers all security requirements? Keep reading for answers to those questions as we walk through the five major components of a VDP “roadmap” that can support teams and project managers when it comes to disclosing and reporting on vulnerabilities and ensuring they get back to the Cybersecurity Infrastructure and Security Agency (CISA). CISA which plays a leading role in managing vulnerabilities (and which has also, incidentally, developed a new VDP platform because it recognizes how crucial – and challenging – effective VDP security can be).

 

VDP security step 1: Outline your goals

Creating a VDP to reinforce your security strategy starts with determining exactly what you hope to get out of your VDP.

Ask questions such as:

  • What is the driving factor for your VDP? Having a clear VDP program is essential if you want to work with US officials. Do you want to promote increased security, improve coordination between teams, increase vulnerability visibility or something else? While VDP security operations can do all of these things, you may choose to prioritize one of them in particular.
  • What are your main VDP pain points? What’s currently getting in the way of vulnerability disclosure? Is it a lack of employee education or lack of communication channels, for instance?
  • What role does your VDP play in your overall business? VDPs don’t just serve security purposes. They can also help you achieve business goals by developing a unique selling proposition..

Once you know your main VDP security goals, you can build and use a VDP application tailored to them.

 

VDP security step 2: Assign responsibilities, develop policies

To start building your program, you need to map responsibilities to stakeholders, then establish policies that define who does what within the context of vulnerability disclosure. CISA offers a template that may be helpful for this purpose.

Identify, for starters, who needs to be aware of the program and who needs to participate in it. Then go deeper by defining specific responsibilities for collecting, analyzing and reporting on vulnerabilities.

Outline as well which security policies your vendors need to adhere to, and how you’ll keep those policies up-to-date. And determine whether vulnerability disclosers will be allowed to remain anonymous. An anonymous disclosure does not make the disclosure any less important. A researcher may simply not want their name on any of the disclosure notes.

Ultimately, your goal during this step should be to lay the groundwork for a community that helps itself with vulnerability disclosure and management. 

 

VDP security step 3: Integrate VDP into your processes

Vulnerability disclosure processes shouldn’t exist in a silo. Instead, they should be integrated into your routine business operations, and your VDP policies map should reflect this.

For example, your VDP should outline how software development, testing and deployment operations interface with VDP reporting requirements. It should also define exactly which tests should be run in an effort to discover vulnerabilities.

By establishing these processes, you not only gain efficiency when it comes to managing vulnerabilities. You also set clear guidelines that employees, researchers and vendors should follow to ensure that all vulnerabilities are discovered and disclosed effectively. You should give CISOs and researchers enough scope so that they can provide valuable feedback, but not so much scope that your team can’t keep up with the incoming reports. 

These policies may also help to drive VDP automation by making it possible to automate VDP discovery and reporting within the context of routine business operations. Education is key across the organization and a security culture needs to be embedded into the fabric of your business. 

 

VDP security step 4: Evaluate vendors

Once you’ve determined which VDP policies your business needs to meet, it’s time to evaluate your vendors and perform due diligence to confirm that they align with your requirements.

Rank your vendors according to their overall security postures. You can sort them into three categories: High security, medium security or low security.

From there, choose which vendors require more monitoring, and which pose such security risks that you can’t work with them. You should also highlight vendors with excellent security records, since you may want to target them for long-term partnerships.

To validate your vendor assessments, collect documentation, including the frameworks and security rules that the vendors adhere to internally. Keep these documents secure and update them periodically because they may change.

 

Read here: All you’ve ever wanted to know about Vulnerability Disclosure Programs (VDPs)

 

VDP security step 5: Continuously monitor and audit VDP compliance

After rolling out your VDP policies and vetting vendors, you need to monitor, measure and audit continuously to ensure that stakeholders continue to follow the guidelines. Your goal here is to ensure that everyone – including internal users like your employees, as well as vendors and other external parties – remain in compliance with VDP policies you establish.

To make this process efficient, you’ll want to automate it as much as possible. Automation also ensures that you can scale your business as VDP requirements grow continuously more complex, and as you integrate more vendors and other stakeholders into your operations.

 

With VDP, everyone wins (except the bad folks)

Establishing clear, transparent and actionable VDP rules is a win-win for everyone (except, of course, the threat actors who want to exploit vulnerabilities). It lays the foundation for effective collaboration while also strengthening relationships with both internal and external stakeholders. And it facilitates the fast resolution of vulnerabilities and breaches by getting vulnerability data to organizations like CISA as rapidly as possible.

Findings bakes VDP into  their platform, making VDP security an effortless operation. With Findings, you can both discover and report on vulnerabilities across your business’s supply chain. Findings bakes the “switch” for vulnerability disclosure directly into your business operations, making your VDP processes efficient, scalable and all-encompassing.

 

Learn more by signing up for a Findings demo.

Our Take on Gartner’s Latest Supply Chain Compliance Advice

our take on supply chain compliance

Going forward, businesses need a new strategy for vetting and monitoring the compliance of their suppliers. But don’t just take our word for it. These are among the takeaways from Gartner’s latest guidance on supply chain compliance and management

 

Gartner highlights why conventional supplier onboarding methods no longer work as businesses need to onboard suppliers quickly, while also ensuring that suppliers meet their compliance requirements.

 

The global supply chain compliance crisis

You probably already know that supply chains are under stress, to put mildly. Gartner points to a couple of main reasons why:

 

  • Businesses are increasingly working with suppliers from new geographic regions, where compliance norms may be different. This complicates onboarding and requires a deeper level of compliance inspection.
  • Organizations often need to add vendors quickly in order to keep their supply chains moving. Yet, without a fast onboarding process, integrating suppliers is time-consuming, which increases the stress placed on supply chains.
  • We’d also add, that issues like global sanctions, which have become especially pronounced as a result of the ongoing Ukraine-Russia war, add even more complexity to vendor onboarding. 

 

We agree wholeheartedly that these are among the key reasons why supply chain compliance and management have become so challenging for the typical business today.

Today, you have to worry not only about whether your vendors meet standard compliance rules, but also about potential sanctions that are subject to constant change. This adds yet more unpredictability and complexity to the onboarding process.

Add to that the surge in supply chain cyber security risks, and it’s no exaggeration to say that operating efficient, compliant supply chains has never been tougher than it is at present.

 

How to streamline supply chain compliance

Gartner suggests three main strategies for addressing the supply chain compliance challenges that businesses currently face.

 

1. Create a playbook for vetting vendors

First, Gartner recommends creating a “playbook that grades each third party’s threat level to determine who gets more attention from the business and compliance.”

 

The idea here is that you can develop preset policies to analyze vendors rapidly during and after the onboarding process. Your policies should reflect information like which risks have impacted your business in the past and how closely a given vendor matches the risk profile of other vendors who have posed challenges.

 

We love this idea not only because it helps businesses to be proactive in their approach to vendor compliance, but also because it lays the groundwork for compliance automation. Playbooks make it possible to implement vendor compliance validation automatically within a security platform, which could sort vendors into high-risk, medium-risk and low-risk categories

This may be of interest to you:

 A CISO’s VDP security roadmap based on criteria defined in the playbooks

2. Automate supply chain compliance

The piece quotes Chris Audet, Senior Director of Research at Gartner, who says, “Compliance leaders must move quickly to onboard third parties and effectively monitor for risks, but many of their traditional methods won’t cut it.”

 

The way to move quickly and monitor for risks comprehensively is to automate risk detection. Automation can help you collect the information you need to make good decisions about vendor risks. It can also automatically flag risks with the help of advanced analytics, and it can help you keep up-to-date as vendor profiles change. In all of these ways, automation helps businesses to complete vendor onboarding quickly, even if they have an increasing number of vendors to vet and face increasing complexity due to new compliance mandates, new sanctions rules or diverse vendor geographies.

 

3. Streamline upfront due diligence

As another way to speed up onboarding, Gartner advises businesses to “streamline due diligence to focus on critical risks.” It suggests doing this by reducing the number of questions you ask vendors to answer manually. Focus validation around critical risk areas, Gartner suggests, rather than asking a large number of questions that may not be relevant for every vendor.

 

We agree. We’d add, though, that it’s important to leverage automation wherever possible to collect as much data as you can about supplier insurance, safety, environment and sustainability initiatives, legal and financial data and any other information that can be helpful for gaining a 360-degree view of your suppliers and sub-suppliers. With automation, it’s possible to onboard rapidly without compromising on your visibility into supply chain compliance.

 

Bonus advice: Establish a compliance-focused company culture

We think Gartner did a great job of capturing much of what it takes to achieve supply chain compliance. But we’d suggest another strategy that Gartner hasn’t mentioned: Building a compliance-centric culture.

 

A compliance-centric culture is one that maximizes collaboration and communication related to compliance. It aligns compliance with vendor expectations, and it allows all stakeholders – both internal and external ones – to share information rapidly in order to manage compliance and supply chain cyber security risks.


Findings helps you to build this culture by providing a platform that anyone can use to raise compliance flags automatically. With Findings, you get holistic compliance that protects your entire supply chain, while also benefiting from automations that allow you to onboard vendors rapidly.

 

Learn more about how Findings can help you to streamline your compliance.

 

Top 5 Reasons Why CMMC Security Will Be Good For Your Business

Top 5 Reasons why CMMC Security will be good

Keeping up to date on the changing CMMC security requirements may seem like a hassle that’s only worth undertaking if you do business with the Department of Defense. But in reality, meeting the new CMMC compliance mandates is a great way to make your business more secure and agile.

That’s why, even if you aren’t a DoD contractor, the CMMC security updates can be beneficial to your business. Keep reading for an overview of what to know about the new CMMC Framework and how to meet it in a way that benefits your business.

Read here how to meet the CMMC compliance challenge head on 

How CMMC is changing

By May 2023, the DoD expects to implement CMMC 2.0, at least in interim form.

Among other changes, CMMC 2.0 reduces the number of compliance “levels” from five to three. This is a major benefit to businesses that need to meet CMMC security mandates because it simplifies the process of choosing which compliance path to follow and adhering to its associated rules. The 3 levels are:

  • Level 1 (Foundational)

This level must match the 15 controls of FAR52.204-21 “basic” controls to protect

Federal Contract Information. Certification is required annually. It is possible for your

organization to self-assess. This is similar to the previous model in CMMC 1.0.

  • Level 2 (Advanced): 

This level is comparable to CMMC 1.0 level 3. Its requirements mirror NIST SP 800-71, which includes 14 levels and 110 security controls developed by the National Institute of Technology and Standards (NIST) to protect sensitive information. The 20 requirements of CMMC 1.0 level 3 compliance have been dropped.

  • Level 3 (Expert)

Under this CMMC 2.0 assessment level, which is comparable to CMMC 1.0 level 5, businesses will require government-led assessments. The focus is on reducing Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) that could lead to data exfiltration or compromised applications. Besides the 110 controls that are required for the new Level 2 certification, the NIST’s SP 800-172 is required for Level 3 certification.

5 great reasons to choose CMMC compliance

Some businesses will need to meet CMMC compliance requirements because they sell to the DoD, and CMMC 2.0 is a mandate. But even if that is not the case, there are great reasons to become CMMC-compliant.

1. Overall CMMC security protection

Implementing security controls using CMMC 2.0 levels is a great way to maximize your overall security posture. It will help to protect sensitive information within your organization and increase the security of your supply chain.

2. Tailor cyber hygiene to your business

CMMC uses maturity processes and cybersecurity best practices from multiple frameworks as its foundation. And, because CMMC security offers different compliance levels, it’s an excellent framework to follow if you want a cybersecurity plan tailored to your business. Not every organization faces the same level of threats or the same level of data sensitivity. With CMMC, you can establish cyber hygiene policies, such as vulnerability disclosure programs, that reflect your organization’s particular needs. 

3. Prepare for upcoming regulatory changes

As we’ve noted, there is a lot of overlap between the CMMC security requirements and other compliance standards, like those developed by NIST. Thus, by becoming CMMC-complaint, you prepare your business to meet similar compliance mandates that may be rolled out in the future.

4. Validate your cybersecurity from the outside

CMMC assessment is a great way to determine how well your business meets security mandates. This can be done not only by internal stakeholders, who are not objective observers, but by outsiders who understand how risks can flow through supply chains and what it takes to build a strong cybersecurity culture within an organization.

5. Winning additional contracts

The higher your level of cyber security, the more competitive you’ll be. Supply chain security is increasingly viewed as a necessity rather than a nice-to-have. Businesses that fail to prioritize security risk losing contracts and relationships with key enterprises.  Additionally, coordinated vulnerability disclosure programs that are apart of the CMMC security framework, help to build trust and positive cooperation across the supply chain.

Here’s Why Your CISO Wants To Implement A CMMC Framework

The future of supply chain security

As you assess what the CMMC security changes mean for your business, don’t think merely in terms of whether you are specifically required to undergo CMMC assessments. Instead, think about how increasing awareness of cybersecurity and building a stronger cyber culture within your organization will pay dividends now and in the future, regardless of your specific CMMC compliance requirements.

After all, security is always changing, and compliance frameworks like the CMMC change with it. Keeping pace with changing requirements is a good way to encourage accountability across your supply chain and enforce strong cyber hygiene standards.

Indeed, it’s a safe bet that, going forward, cyber security requirements will become tighter, not looser. Embrace the trend now by using frameworks like the CMMC to supercharge your cyber hygiene and disclosure programs, rather than waiting until a specific mandates is handed down that affects you.

Schedule a call to learn more

The 7-Step Guide To CMMC Assessment

7 Step Guide to CMMC Assessment

Just when you thought you were on top of CMMC compliance, CMMC 2.0 has come along, upping the stakes for identifying and managing cybersecurity within your business. On top of that, the new National Initiative for Improving Cybersecurity in Supply Chains (NIICS) adds yet another layer of compliance complication for businesses that want to do business with the government. All of this means that having a streamlined process in place for meeting updated compliance mandates is more important than ever.

 

Fortunately, you don’t have to rebuild all of your compliance and assessment processes from the ground up to meet CMMC 2.0 and other new compliance needs. If you already have compliance procedures in place that address NIST standards or similar U.S. government mandates, there’s a good chance that you can expand upon them to address CMMC 2.0 compliance, too.

The challenge of CMMC assessment

Let’s be clear: CMMC assessments are challenging, no matter how streamlined your compliance program is or how much cybersecurity expertise you have in-house. Beyond the complex technical rules you have to meet, you have challenges such as:

 

  • Meeting deadlines: You can’t perform assessments according to timelines you create. You need to meet externally imposed deadlines.
  • Shareholder buy-in: Assessments cost time and money. You need to convince shareholders that the assessment is worth the investment.
  • Cost of certification: Becoming certified, too, comes with a cost, which makes it even harder in some respects to get buy-in.

In the long run, achieving CMMC compliance is well worth it because it allows your business to do business with the DoD. But that doesn’t mean that CMMC assessment is simple or straightforward.

 

Here’s 4 Reasons Why Your CISO Wants To Implement A CMMC Framework

Key differences between NIST and CMMC assessment

As we noted, companies that already have compliance programs designed to meet NIST cybersecurity standards are in a good position to extend upon those programs to address CMMC assessment requirements, too. Both frameworks allow for self-assessments, at least in some cases, and the assessment processes are similar.

But NIST and CMMC are not identical, of course. You must understand the differences before you devise a CMMC assessment strategy based on NIST.

 

One obvious difference is that NIST requirements are developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, whereas the Department of Defense oversees CMMC compliance requirements. This means that NIST and CMMC rules could evolve in different directions in the future, even though there is some overlap today.

 

On top of this, under the CMMC framework, not everyone can self-assess. Third-party assessments are required for businesses that manage data that the DoD considers critical to national defense. So, before building a CMMC 2.0 compliance strategy based on self-assessment, be sure you’re actually eligible to self-assess.

7 essential steps for CMMC assessments

If you determine that you can self-assess, then you can build a CMMC assessment process based on the assessment operations you already have in place for NIST or similar standards. Here’s how to do that, step-by-step.

Step 1: Set goals

Start by determining why you are performing a CMMC assessment. Is it because you are specifically required to do so as a contractor for the DoD? Or are you doing it voluntarily, as a means of assessing your cyber health? In the latter case, you have more control over the assessment process and its outcomes, because you won’t have to report to the DoD.

Step 2: Determine assessments you have completed

Identify which assessments your business has already performed, and compare those assessments to CMMC assessment requirements. Again, there is a lot of overlap between requirements like NIST’s and CMMC’s, so you may be able to duplicate large parts of your existing assessments.

Step 3: Perform gap analysis

Of course, there is not likely to be complete overlap between existing assessments and CMMC. You’ll need to perform a gap analysis (or hire an outside auditor for this purpose) to determine which additional data you’ll need to collect or processes you’ll have to undertake to perform CMMC assessment.

Step 4: Create or update the SSP

NIST defines the System Security Plan, or SSP, as a “formal document that provides an overview of the security requirements for the system and describes the security controls in place or planned for meeting those requirements.” You’ll want to have an SSP in place because it serves as the basis for authorization decisions, while also providing detailed information to support processes and activities in the system development lifecycle. Thus, the SSP serves as the information foundation for your CMMC assessment operation.

Step 5: Build a plan of action and milestones

Next, form a plan of action and milestones (POA&M), which is the roadmap you plan to follow after creating your SSP. The POA&M defines a clear course of action to take and goals you plan to meet to ensure that employees and stakeholders know their roles in keeping and advancing compliance goals. Your POA&M should identify the tasks that need to be completed to secure your systems, proposed remediations for risks and which employees will perform which tasks.

Step 6: Form a remediation plan

The results of your gap analysis should form the basis for a remediation plan. The purpose of this plan is to allow you to pinpoint compliance risks to remediate, prioritize activities to fix vulnerabilities and determine the associated costs you’ll pay to become CMMC-certified. You can formulate the remediation plan yourself, or outsource it to a Managed Security Service Provider (MSSP).

Step 7: Maintain compliance and reporting

Treat CMMC assessment as an ongoing process, not a one-and-done affair. You’ll need to update your plans continuously as your risks change. Changes to your vendors or supply chains may necessitate compliance changes, too. And you’ll want to monitor for risks on an ongoing basis so that you can remediate them immediately, rather than waiting till your next assessment to discover and address problems.

Achieving a well-implemented CMMC assessment framework

When you follow the steps described above, you get a well-maintained cybersecurity program that enables CMMC certification, while also enhancing supply chain security and keeping sensitive data and intellectual property more secure. And you can do it all without having to overhaul your compliance tools or processes from scratch.

 
 

Learn more about becoming CMMC compliant

Crisis Management: The Missing Link In Supply Chain Security

Crisis-Management--The-Missing-Link-In-Supply-Chain-Security

It’s easy to treat crisis management as an afterthought within the context of supply chain security. Businesses may assume that attacks are unlikely to happen, especially if they’ve invested in risk assessment and mitigation. Just ask some of the major vendors that have been at the root of cybersecurity crisis in the recent past, despite having taken breach prevention quite seriously.

What is a cybersecurity crisis management strategy?

A crisis management strategy provides a protocol for organizations to identify, eliminate and recover from cybersecurity attacks as swiftly as possible; its purpose is to  position the organization for minimal impact of a cybersecurity incident. The protocol will unquestionably reduce the stress on your executive and IT teams in a crisis situation and everyone else involved in mitigating an attack. 

The protocol typically includes, who does what in the event of a cyber incident, who is in charge of managing the crisis, aka  Cybersecurity Crisis Response Team (“Response Team” or “CCRT”). It also covers which  systems need to be checked for impact and where the backups are located; which partners, vendors and customers need to be notified and at what stage does the Board of Directors and media need to be addressed and how. 

For many organizations, this strategy is not only  the responsible thing to do, but may also be a compliance mandate.

 

Two policies we suggest you look at:

Your Vulnerability Disclosure Policy Can be Easier Than You Think

 Meeting The CMMC Compliance challenge Head On

 

But where do you start? In contrast to many other security protocols – like privacy disclosure requirements, which are usually straightforward enough – there is no predefined playbook you can follow or set of boxes you can check off, to plan for crisis management. 

It is therefore up to each organization to research and create their own set of protocols. We’ve highlighted what should be in yours below.

Supply chain security: Your crisis management plan

Step 1: Risk assessment

The first step is to identify your supply chain security risks.

Do this by assessing which regulations and legal requirements your business is bound to when it comes to cybersecurity. You should also evaluate your contractual obligations. Next, identify vulnerabilities that exist within your supply chain security and risk management report. Do these vulnerabilities need to be reported to other vendors within your supply chain? Or can they be easily patched? Finally, examine how a breach may impact your business’s operations.

The easiest way to check your metal here is to take risk assessments test surveys and run some gap analysis – doing so will give you a complete score on where your current efforts stand compared to where you should be and industry standards. 

If you find any “show-stoppers,” you must stop your process and fix it before moving forward to avoid failure at a later stage.

With this insight, you can develop a plan for managing the impact.

Step 2: Formalize your security and risk management plan

Once you’ve identified the risks, document them and put them in writing, along with a plan that spells out which steps various stakeholders need to take during an incident to mitigate the risks.

Specifically, your plan should detail:

  • Whom – such as vendors, partners, customers, regulatory authorities – you need to notify about a supply chain breach. And, your head of cyber security should also be formalized.
  • Which processes various stakeholders – such as executive, IT and public relations teams will follow to do their part in handling the incident.
  • How you’ll maintain the necessary level of transparency (which should be defined within your Vulnerability Disclosure Program).
  • What information to disclose to the media, and how to disclose it. Not every part of every incident needs to be publicized, but you should think strategically ahead of time about how to engage with the media.

Step 3: Practice cyber drills

In order to ensure your crisis management plan actually works as you intend it to, you should run through cyber drills, which mean engaging stakeholders in responding to simulated incidents.

If you have the resources, you can hire a professional penetration testing team to create a mock incident, then test your business’s response. Alternatively, you may use your own teams to create a simulated supply chain attack, using a red team/green team model.

The more drills you practice, the better, but you should perform one drill annually at a minimum.

Step 4: Make crisis management a collective business responsibility

Next, work to ensure that everyone in the business – not just the IT team and security experts, but everyone from PR and customer relations to sales and marketing, to the C-suite and beyond – understands your supply chain crisis management plan and knows how to play their role within it.

Do this by publishing the process in a place where all stakeholders can view it. You can also ask stakeholders to explain their role in crisis management, based on the published plan.

Be sure, too, that the plan nominates someone to take the lead in crisis management unless your business already has an obvious person (such as a CISO) to take on this role.

Step 5: Leverage crisis management

Finally, to get even more buy-in for the plan and generate business value from it, educate your sales and marketing teams in particular about the investments you’ve made in crisis management.

This is important because sales and marketing teams can tout your crisis management investments when selling your products to other companies that require a high level of supply chain security and risk management. The more commitment you can demonstrate to managing supply chain risks effectively, the better positioned you’ll be to win customers who need strong supply chain security guarantees.

Winning such business is certainly not the only reason to invest in crisis management planning, but landing more customers this way can’t hurt.

 

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4 Reasons Why Your CISO Wants To Implement A CMMC Framework

4-Reasons-Why-Your-CISO-Wants-To-Implement-A-CMMC-Framework

“Let’s pursue a new compliance framework just because we feel like it!” is not a phrase that you tend to hear business leaders utter excitedly. After all, making the changes necessary to comply with new compliance rules is a significant undertaking. Unless a specific legal requirement is at stake, businesses tend to embrace them slowly.

However, the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) is an exception. Although CMMC is not strictly required for most businesses, implementing it should be a priority for many CISOs today. 

Indeed, a CISO’s main job is to harden cybersecurity wherever possible. Doing so requires identifying security risks, developing practices and policies to mitigate those risks, and creating regular reports that track the effectiveness of cybersecurity investments. Because the CMMC encourages these practices, pursuing CMMC compliance is an excellent way for CISOs to achieve their primary goals.

“All DoD contractors will eventually be required to obtain a CMMC certification,” as CSO Online notes, which may be another reason CISOs implement CMMC compliance. But it shouldn’t be the only one: Whether or not you need to do business with the U.S. Department of Defense, pursuing CMMC compliance is a great idea.

Four reasons to implement CMMC

You achieve several critical benefits when you invest the time and effort required to implement CMMC compliance.

1. Independent cybersecurity validation

Among the recent changes to CMMC is a new independent validation requirement for businesses with CMMC level 3 compliance. Independent validation provides a more thorough security check and vulnerability reporting than you can get from following other security guidelines, like those from NIST (which closely resembled the original version of CMMC).

Thus, CMMC is a more rigorous cybersecurity framework in many respects than anything else you can find.

2. Holistic cybersecurity best practices

CMMC is designed to encourage solid cyber hygiene for businesses of all types and industries.

It encourages a proactive cybersecurity culture (ESG benefits because it demonstrates a commitment to privacy). It facilitates education for all employees – including non-technical stakeholders – about security best practices. And it underlines the importance of managing supply chain security risks, one of the most severe categories of threats that businesses face today.

3. Increased revenue

From a purely business perspective, the additional sales opportunities that CMMC compliance opens up can lead to revenue growth.

When you achieve CMMC compliance, you can do business with U.S. government agencies that might otherwise be off-limits. This means more clients, but it often means more significant client contracts because government agencies tend to be high-value, long-term accounts.

4. Enhanced security maturity

Even in cases where clients aren’t government agencies and don’t require CMMC compliance, being CMMC compliant can nonetheless be a significant boon to business. It helps you demonstrate a commitment to cybersecurity and serves as a stamp of quality/security on the security front, which can help you close more deals and retain more clients.

The enhanced security maturity that comes with CMMC compliance can help you stay ahead of the competition, which may comply with less rigorous mandates but not with CMMC.

Here are the CMMC Compliance Requirements: Everything You Need To Know

Granted, CMMC implementation is not a simple task: It’s essential for CISOs to understand the challenges before undertaking a CMMC compliance initiative:

  • Process: You have to apply for CMMC compliance. That’s another task for CISOs to manage on their already full plates.
  • Buy-in: CISOs need to get buy-in from shareholders and management for the CMMC process. That’s important not just culturally but also because business leaders will need to play a valuable role in the CMMC application process by filing forms, tracking progress and reporting, etc.
  • Multiple steps: Applying for CMMC compliance is not a one-and-done affair. It usually involves multiple steps, with changes or additional information required as you progress through the process.
  • Maintenance: You need to keep your compliance strategy continuously updated to meet CMMC compliance requirements. That increases your time and effort even further.
  • Cost: For most businesses, CMMC compliance will require new tools and processes, which come at a cost. And depending on what level of CMMC compliance you need, an outside advisor may also be required.

None of these challenges should prevent businesses from pursuing a comprehensive CMMC framework to protect against cyberattacks compliance. But it’s essential to be aware of the potential objections and barriers before starting the process.

Even if CMMC compliance is technically optional for your business, there’s a good reason not to treat it as an option. Instead, CISOs should embrace CMMC implementation as an intelligent way to strengthen their business’s cybersecurity – and, in turn, open up new business opportunities.

Learn more by scheduling a demo.

Your Vulnerability Disclosure Policy Can Be Easier Than You Think

Your-Vulnerability-Disclosure-Policy-Can-Be-Easier-Than-You-Think

It’s easy to recognize the importance of creating a vulnerability disclosure policy. Vulnerability disclosure policies, or VDPs, are important because they help you track vulnerabilities within your supply chain and determine how to disclose security risks that arise within the supply chain. That’s a best practice for any business, not to mention a formal requirement for companies wishing to do business with the DOD and U.S. government agencies.

It can be pretty hard, however, to figure out how to define and enforce such a policy. If you’re like many businesses, you may struggle to determine which types of vulnerabilities to disclose, how to report them, and how to integrate these rules into a policy document that your business uses as a systematic guide whenever supply chain vulnerabilities arise.

Fortunately, it’s easy enough to work past these challenges. By taking a step-by-step approach to creating a vulnerability disclosure policy, you can define and enforce disclosure rules tailored to your business’s needs with much less effort than you may imagine.

More information below on managing and building relationships with your vendors:

The insider’s guide to coordinated vulnerability disclosure

&

Watch below: How you can interact with vendors and suppliers  – headache free

The main purpose of vulnerability disclosure

Establishing an effective vulnerability disclosure policy starts with understanding what such a policy is supposed to do.

Vendor disclosure programs  have two main benefits:

Streamlined vulnerability reporting: A VDP defines who in your organization handles vulnerability reporting. This is important because many companies don’t know who the right person is to generate and distribute reports. Without a predefined reporting policy, you’re likely to end up with delays, or reports that never happen at all because no one knew who was supposed to create them.

Real-time reporting: Just as important, VDPs make it possible to react in real-time to vulnerabilities and breaches. As soon as you detect a security issue, you can report it to stakeholders or CISA, as required based on factors like which systems the incident impacts and how severe it is. The ability to disclose issues immediately and be fully transparent demonstrates a strong commitment to security on the part of your organization, which in turn helps your brand weather security events. Rapid disclosure may also be a compliance requirement for some businesses, as we’ve noted. But rapid disclosure means you need a complete view over your whole supply chain, not an easy task unless you have an automation tool to help with checking and reporting vulnerabilities.

Every VDP should be designed with these benefits in mind.

The six components of a vulnerability disclosure policy

To enable efficient, real-time vulnerability reporting, you should create a VDP in the form of a document that details six key facets of vulnerability disclosure.

1. Compliance policies

Your VDP should specify which compliance rules your business needs to meet, and which vulnerability disclosures those rules require.

The details in this section of the VDP will vary depending on your business and its compliance context. Not only do compliance requirements vary between geographies and industries, but businesses may also be exposed to different mandatory disclosure rules based on factors like the size of the business and the nature of a given breach. These are a few of the important policies you may come across ISO27001, NIST, ENISA, CMMC ISO, GDPR, HIPPA, CPPA (to name a few), and these need to be kept up-to-date with compliance rules changing every so often.

Whatever your specific requirements are, the goal of this section of your VDP should be to spell out the business’s disclosure responsibilities relative to its compliance mandates. 

2. Contractual obligations

In addition to compliance mandates, your business may be required by the contracts it signs with vendors, customers or partners to disclose vulnerabilities. Thus, one section of your VDP should address contractual vulnerability disclosure obligations.

Be sure to detail in this section not just when and to whom you have to disclose security issues, but also how the disclosures should be communicated. Typically, your agreements with other businesses will specify how communication is to be maintained in this context. By including this detail in your VDP, you ensure that you can find it easily, without having to piece through contracts.

3. Supply chain obligations

If vulnerabilities arise somewhere in your supply chain as opposed to your own systems, you may need to disclose those, too. Your VDP should include a section that spells out your obligations in this regard. It should also include information about how you maintain visibility into your supply chain and determine that a vulnerability has affected it.

4. Risk management and assessment

Every vulnerability is unique, and the ability to contextualize it based on its seriousness is critical for effective disclosure. Toward this end, define within your VDP how to calculate the overall security severity of each vulnerability, as well as how this security score impacts your disclosure procedures.

If you use risk assessment tools to automate the scoring process (as you should if you want it to take place in real-time and with minimal effort on the part of your team), include that information in the VDP, too.

5. Insurance coverage

In many cases, insurance can cover at least some losses incurred due to a security issue within your supply chain. For this reason, be sure that your VDP details which security insurance you have and how it applies to disclosures. 

6. Incident response plans

Disclosing vulnerabilities is one thing, mitigating is another.. Your VDP should include an overview of how your business responds to security incidents in order to ensure that they are remediated. In addition, if you’re required to keep stakeholders aware of progress toward remediation while an incident response is underway, spell out how you’ll do that within your VDP. 

Take a look at how Log4j, Kaseya and other recent supply chain attacks have caused damage

How vulnerability disclosure statements optimize security

With a comprehensive VDP statement, you ensure that you are prepared to react in a way that minimizes the incident’s impact on your business, your vendors, your partners, your customers, and your supply chain in general.

In turn, you can make informed decisions about the following:

  • When to keep doing business with vendors who introduced a vulnerability into your supply chain
  • How to work with vendors to keep their risk levels low – and, by extension, keep your supply chain secure
  • When to switch to different vendors to lower your risk
  • Communicate effectively both “upstream” (meaning with your vendors and suppliers) and “downstream” (with customers and partners) when a vulnerability arises, as the image below from FIRST.org, a global organization focused on security improvements, illustrates

You can’t prevent every vulnerability or security incident. But you can prepare ahead of time to react quickly and effectively in meeting your obligations to disclose security issues when they happen – whether they stem from a vulnerability within your own IT estate or a problem that originated with another business in your supply chain.

You can make the vulnerability disclosure process even more efficient, which automates supply chain security detection and reporting.

Learn More Findings – Optimizing Supply Chain Compliance

Russian sanctions made trade Compliance a Burning Issue – Here’s Everything You MUST Know

Trade Compliance | Findings.co

You may have heard about trade compliance before, but do you know its meaning? It’s an essential part of international trade, and it’s amongst the few things that will put your company at risk if you don’t abide by it. 

Here is everything you must know about trade compliance and why it matters so much these days with everything going on with Russia.

What Does Trade Compliance Cover?

In short, trade compliance requirements can impact your ability to import or export into foreign markets and effectively operate within your territory. Trade compliance applies to any company operating across borders; even if you plan on staying stateside and selling in only one jurisdiction, there is still a good chance that a local regulator will make contact at some point in your company’s life cycle. It isn’t always apparent whether a law requires you to comply with its provisions.

Trade compliance is defined as “an aspect of corporate compliance which ensures that all import and export transactions are in conformance with the laws and regulations of the countries involved,” according to Daw Jones Risk and Compliancy glossary.

What is the U.S. Department of Commerce Rules Regarding Export Control?

The U.S. Department of Commerce maintains a set of rules regarding export control that every business should know about—even if you don’t think your company is doing any business abroad. These rules include what products can be shipped outside of our borders and how they can be traded (and sometimes not traded).

These guidelines ensure we’re not selling or sending anything to countries we have sanctions against—like Iran or North Korea—or the newly star Russia.

What might surprise you is that there are particular nuances to how trade compliance works.

Russia made trade compliance a priority.

As part of Russia’s aggression and invading Ukraine, The U.S. has issued sanctions against Russia’s banks, business people, and other financial services to disrupt these funding sources. 

U.S. sanctions don’t apply to U.S. companies or people, but they impose restrictions on non-US persons’ dealings. The broad range of U.S. sanctions programs and rules means that almost any non-US citizen or entity doing business with a person on a sanctioned list violates U.S. law. This includes foreign subsidiaries of U.S. companies.

U.S. trade sanctions can have serious consequences, including fines and imprisonment. For that reason, it’s essential for firms operating internationally to make sure they have systems in place to comply with trade compliance laws. It’s also important to understand that these penalties are not just reserved for trade sanctions; sentences can be imposed against those who fail to take reasonable steps to ensure their trade partners are not violating trade compliance laws.

Businesses must understand trade compliance regulations so that they don’t run afoul of them or understand their risks to manage them appropriately.

There are four ways that trade compliance applies to you:

1) You might import goods into or export goods out of a sanctioned country

2) You might do business with someone who does

3) Your customer may purchase goods from someone who does

4) Your customer may sell goods to someone who does

Suppose you import goods into or export goods out of a sanctioned country. In that case, The Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), which falls under the Treasury Department, administers and enforces trade sanctions against targeted countries. 

OFAC tracks all U.S.-based financial transactions and shipments leaving and entering U.S. ports via air freight or sea freight transport services. If you import goods into or export goods out of a sanctioned country, those goods will fall under trade compliance rules administered by OFAC.

You must file a report with OFAC before importing or exporting those goods to ensure that neither you nor your customers violate trade sanctions. 

For example, suppose one of your supplier’s purchases steel from Russia and ships it to China, where it is assembled into final products. In that case, Chinese importers have to comply with trade sanctions if they want to re-export those products back into the United States. This could also apply if you have manufacturing facilities in China since any imported raw materials would still fall under trade compliance rules administered by OFAC.

Risk Management – Effective Trade Compliance And Supply Chain Management 

CAATSA, or The Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, will profoundly impact global trade compliance. CAATSA was signed into law by President Trump in August 2017 and mandates sanctions against Iran, North Korea, Russia, and Venezuela. It also prohibits foreign entities from doing business with U.S. companies unless they are compliant with CAATSA. 

Many organizations also want to do business with sanctioned countries like Russia, Iran, and North Korea because they offer lower prices than other suppliers. However, before engaging in any trade activity involving these countries or individuals under U.S. sanctions laws, you must ensure that your organization has effective trade compliance programs. Otherwise, you risk facing severe penalties under CAATSA if you engage in transactions involving blocked persons without first obtaining authorization from OFAC (Office of Foreign Assets Control).

Effortless Trade Compliance

Cut the processing time in half and ignore “experts advisors” – When you use the findings’ platform, you can automate your entire trade compliance process.

Automate your assessments, enable best practices, and give your supply chain the advantage.

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A retired asset owner reveals – These 3 things will attract investors like flies

A-retired-asset-owner-reveals-–-These-3-things-will-attract-investors-like-flies

3 things you should be doing to attract ESG investors

ESG (environmental, social, and governance) investors are becoming more popular as millennials enter the workforce. Around 60% of ESG-focused funds show growth in assets under management over the past year. But what can companies do to attract more ESG money? This article will look at three things to consider when working with ESG investors to attract sustainable investment dollars.

1) Allocation matters

An ESG-friendly portfolio is an integral part of a sustainable investment strategy, but it’s just as crucial for investors that manage other people’s money (OPM). These days, many clients expect their financial advisors to invest sustainably and request environmental, social, and governance (ESG) information when reviewing or choosing an advisor. Advisers need to demonstrate how they manage sustainability in their portfolios to earn new business from clients seeking out these investments. And for those who don’t offer such solutions today, it will likely become increasingly necessary to compete and keep up with shifting investor preferences over time. In either case, OPM advisers need to do two things: identify relevant ESG factors within their client’s portfolios and then make informed investment decisions in line with client expectations.

2) Education is important

When searching for potential investments, Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) investors perform a thorough due diligence process. While your business might not be eligible for an asset from a fund, these types of investors can still help by providing feedback and advice. Remember, there is no shame in being honest about how much work your business needs. The more willing you are to self-critique, the easier it will be for others to trust that you’re working towards those changes. It’s important to remain honest about yourself and realistic about your goals. Remember that potential investors want to see transparency and honesty.

3) Be transparent

A growing number of institutional investors are pressuring organizations they invest in to disclose more about their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) performance. They’re asking companies many questions – some that might even seem uncomfortable at first. The purpose of these questions is transparency and improving performance, though it can feel like an interrogation at times. Transparency doesn’t come easily, but there are three things organizations can do to make sure they’re ready for such conversations with ESG-minded investors. First, have all your numbers together. This means having clear information on everything from greenhouse gas emissions levels to community involvement efforts available when you sit down with ESG investors. It takes work to get those numbers put together, but it’s worth it. Second, build relationships. One of the most important parts of successfully navigating any conversation is knowing your partners inside and out. Take time to research each ESG investor beforehand to know what kinds of topics they want to be addressed and how they usually approach them. Also, take care not to assume things based on past experiences with other investors or one-off interactions. Every organization and every investor will be different. Third, keep records of your progress. Keeping track of your progress sends a clear message to ESG investors that you’re committed to being transparent in both action and communication with them going forward. Although it may sound tedious, documented progress shows that you’re serious about maintaining transparency in your ESG practices and giving your investors peace of mind.

Did you know Findings ESG offers the first-ever comprehensive supply-chain platform for all of your ESG reporting / best practices needs? 

Don’t settle for less – Try it now.

The Top 20 Cybersecurity and Supply Chain Conferences of 2022

Findings.co | supply chain | security | ESG

As the supply chain security and cybersecurity landscape evolve, the industry becomes increasingly savvy about protecting digital assets. This year brings a slew of events dedicated to managing and enhancing cybersecurity knowledge and awareness. Some events will take place in person, while others will be virtual, making it possible for anyone to participate. We love this new reality!  

These conferences will not be missed, so open your calendar app and plan accordingly!

Cybertech Global TLV

March 1 – 3, 2022

Tel Aviv, Israel 

Cybertech features a diverse array of speakers from dozens of countries worldwide who are leaders in the cyber industry. Top executives, government officials, and leading decision-makers in the field will give the talks and lectures at the event. Cybertech includes conference sessions, special events by invitation, and a grand exhibition allowing attendees to meet and mingle with one another.  

Speakers include known industry personalities from Israel, the US, and Europe, including Amir Sage, Cyber Coordinator of the Cyber Security Department in Israel’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Merav Kenan, CEO of the Israeli High-Tech Association; Umino Atsushi, Director of the Office of the Director-General for Cybersecurity, MIC, Japan; and Janne Kankanen, CEO of the National Emergency Supply Agency of Finland. 

Pharma Supply Chain & Security World 2022

Corvus Global Events

March 15 – 16, 2022

Online

Counterfeit drugs are an ongoing problem for pharmaceutical companies that enter the supply chain at several points. This virtual event focuses on optimizing supply chain challenges in the pharmaceutical supply industry. In this online conference, participants will learn to create value across the supply chain by streamlining and designing an optimal supply chain network. 

Innovations like IoT, AI, ML, and blockchain will be explored for their applications in transforming the pharmaceutical supply chain. 

Among the speakers at the Pharma conference is Emre Gollu, Supply Chain Associate Director at UCB, and Himanshu Agrawal, Director – Global Process Owner & Innovation Lead, Supply Chain Logistics at GSK. 

Women in Cybersecurity

March 17 – 19

Cleveland, Ohio

The three-day WiCyS conference is the flagship event of Women in Cybersecurity. This organization has been around for a decade and is dedicated to advancing the role of women in the field of cybersecurity. The conference brings together veterans and newcomers to the industry from all walks of life and offers resume review and career mentoring opportunities. 

This event is focused on opportunities for women but is open to all genders. 

A slew of workshops, presentations, panel discussions, and more will feature speakers such as Sarba Roy, Product Security Engineer at Intel, and Natalie Pittore, Chief of Enduring Security Frameworks at the NSA. 

CISO Sydney

March 22 – 23, 2022

Sydney, Australia

Managing digital assets and services risks for supply chain security will major this year’s CISO Sydney event. At this event, Australia’s leading experts in information security will share their insights into improving cybersecurity culture and awareness. CISO Sydney encourages participants to “Be inspired, collaborate, disrupt.” 

The featured keynote speaker is the Honorable Karen Andrews, MP Minister for Home Affairs of the Australian government. 

She will discuss the government’s plans to protect the country, communities, and industries against cyberattacks. CISO Sydney promises to be a lively, social gathering exploring how Australian organizations approach cybersecurity from a holistic perspective. 

Cybertech Miami

(This conference was postponed)

Miami, Florida

This year’s Cybertech family of conferences will include an inaugural event in Miami. The summit will gather cyber leaders from the United States and Latin America to discuss challenges and solutions in cybersecurity today.

Some of the themes will include the role of media organizations in cybersecurity, cyber influence on intelligence-gathering, and the impact of 5G technology on cybersecurity. The full lineup of speakers at Cybertech Miami is yet to be announced, but seeing as this event is part of the Cybertech Global family, it promises to be an exciting, dynamic conference. 

The Official Cyber Security Summit

March 25, 2022

Atlanta, GA and online

This 7th annual daylong conference is jam-packed and focuses on educating attendees about protecting vulnerable business applications and critical infrastructure. It offers attendees the opportunity to meet some of the leading solution providers in the United States and discover products and services bringing innovation to enterprise cyber security. 

The sessions, presentations, and panel discussions feature some top cybersecurity experts today. Admission includes meals and networking opportunities, and a virtual live-stream option is available. 

Chad Hunt, Supervisor of the FBI’s Computer Intrusion Squad, will be a keynote speaker at the summit. Those looking to get a head start can already access the summit’s online Security Content Sharing portal to learn about protecting businesses from cyber attacks. 

GFMI’s 14th Edition Third-Party Vendor Risk Management for Financial Institutions

April 11 – 13, 2022

New York, NY

The Global Financial Markets Institute’s 14th edition event will offer third-party risk professionals innovative perspectives on supply chain resilience and provide new insights into managing third-party risk. 

Taking place in the heart of the world’s financial center, speakers at this event include some of the foremost experts in cybersecurity and risk management from the big banks. 

Key sessions include Scotiabank’s talk on boosting supply chain resilience and MUFG Union Bank’s session on identifying concentration risk. Among the notable speakers are Donald Saxinger, Chief of IT Supervision at FDIC, and Dolly Singh, Managing Director, Global Head of Corporate Third Party Oversight at JP Morgan. 

Supply Chain Meetup

April 26 – 28, 2022

Online

Focused on the retail supply chain’s current state and evolution, Supply Chain Meetup is a virtual gathering that provides collaboration, networking, learning, and career development opportunities. The online event will bring together hundreds of experts from across the retail supply chain. The full lineup will be announced in the coming weeks.  

Cybersecurity and Privacy Professionals Conference 

May 3 – 5, 2022

Baltimore, MD

This event allows attendees to discuss trends and issues in information security and privacy with their peers and hear from some of the leading solution providers in the field. 

The theme of this year’s conference is The Future is Ours to Shape: Developing Staff and Operations for Tomorrow’s Cybersecurity and Privacy. Cybersecurity and privacy professionals were invited to submit their proposals for this grassroots educational event, including information-sharing, networking, and collaboration.

Cybertech Asia

(Postponed: Cybertech Asia has been postponed till May 2023 )

Sands Expo, Singapore

Cybertech Asia will take place in Singapore next summer. The event will be being held in partnership with Milipol, Asia-Pacific’s leading international homeland security international event. The conference will feature a range of sessions and special events on cybersecurity. The entire speaker schedule is yet to be announced, but interested parties can already get involved through an online portal that can be used for networking with other conference-goers. 

Cybertech Asia serves as a dialogue on threats and solutions that impact the global community. Topics covered at the conference include finance, mobile, health, mobility, insurance, and more. 

RSA San Francisco 

June 6 – 9, 2022

San Francisco

At the four-day RSA Conference, cybersecurity professionals come together to discuss perspectives and challenges and network with one another. The event features an Expo in which attendees will find products and solutions and a digital-only option for those unable to attend the conference in person. 

Some of the notable speakers include Dr. Christopher Pierson, Founder and CEO of BlackCloak. Tim Weston, Cybersecurity Coordinator at the DHS/TSA, and Alyssa Miller, Business Information Security Officer at S&P Global Ratings. 

Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit 

June 7 – 10, 2022

National Harbor, MD

The Gartner Management Summit is aimed at chief information security officers and leaders in cybersecurity and risk management. It will feature keynote speakers from leading IT security personalities alongside experts from Gartner’s team of unbiased analysts. The conference will focus on establishing an agile security program, fostering a human-centric security culture, and devolving risk ownership. 

Participants will choose to attend sessions from among eleven unique tracks, such as Cyberthreat: Mitigation, Preparedness, Exposure Management; Infrastructure Security; Midsize Enterprise; Identity and Access Management, and several others. 

Cybertech Global UAE – Dubai

June 13 – 14, 2022

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Cybertech Dubai will focus on timely topics in cybersecurity with industry experts and government officials worldwide. Cybertech Dubai features a diverse range of speakers in the global hub that connects Europe, Africa, and the Far East. 

The sessions and special events will focus on AI, Advanced IoT, big data, cloud, blockchain, and more. Leaders will deliver talks in government and enterprise from throughout the US, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. 

Total Security Conference Hong Kong

July 7, 2022 

Hong Kong

CISOs, heads of IT, heads of security, and regulators face a rapidly-changing climate filled with new vulnerabilities. As cyberattacks become more sophisticated and remote work becomes the norm, security and risk mitigation priorities evolve. The 8th annual Total Security Conference focuses on ensuring a seamless transition to virtualization through efficiently securing data, endpoints, and operational touchpoints. This conference features information sessions, meetings, and networking to allow corporate, public, and government agencies to enhance their approach to cybersecurity. 

The lineup of speakers is not yet finalized; stay tuned…

CSO50 Conference and Awards

September 2022 

Location to be announced

The CSO50 Conference and Awards feature risk strategies for rising threats. It will showcase innovation to protect and defend risk leadership and innovation to preserve and defend risk leadership and innovation. 

Top leaders in risk management and cybersecurity will be awarded at the conference and present talks on recent developments in the industry. 

Some of the speakers slated to present at this conference include Keith Slotter, VP Corporate Security at JetBlue Airways; Nicole Ford, VP & CISO at Carrier; and Jessica Bair, Director of the Cisco Secure Technical Alliance at Cisco. 

National Cyber Summit

September 21 – 22

Huntsville, Alabama

NCS2022 is billed as the nation’s most innovative cybersecurity-technology event. It offers educational, collaborative, and workforce development opportunities for industry visionaries and rising leaders in the field. 

The summit will bring together leaders of both enterprise and government organizations to discuss digital forensics, supply chain cybersecurity research, data mining, and the societal impacts and ethics of cybersecurity. Several tracks of the conference will run concurrently, and the list of speakers includes Chris Cleary, Principal Cyber Advisor of the US Navy; Brian Turner, Executive Assistant Director of the Criminal, Cyber, Response, and Services Branch of the FBI; and Merritt Baer, Principal Security Architect at Amazon Web Services.  

InfoSec World

September 26 – 29, 2022

Coronado Springs, Lake Buena Vista, Florida

One of the longest-running events of its kind, InfoSec World is in its 28th year and offers some of the industry’s premier education and networking opportunities. This year’s conference includes summits and workshops on supply chain security, ransomware, threat testing, cryptocurrency, cloud security, and more. Each of these topics will be expanded upon at the conference, such as the cloud security summit and supply chain workshop, taking place on the event’s final day. 

Speakers are yet to be finalized, and the world’s leading companies have been presenters at previous InfoSec conferences. InfoSec World provides attendees with the tools and information they need to stay at the forefront of today’s cybersecurity challenges.

International Cyber Expo

September 27 – 28, 2022

London, England

The International Cyber Expo unites government, industry, and academia at a series of roundtable discussions, pavilions, exhibitions, demonstrations, and a summit. All focused on the primary issues facing cybersecurity professionals today. The expo will also showcase the latest products, technologies, and services from over 350 leading industry suppliers. Attendees will include leaders in cyber policy, government, CISOs, export leaders, and other C-suite professionals coming together to discuss protecting and securing high-level networks.

Cyber Security World Asia 

October 12 – 13, 2022

Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

This event brings together industry leaders from some of the top cybersecurity companies throughout Asia and the world. Cyber Security World is suitable for security professionals in dozens of roles who share a common desire to invest in cybersecurity and defend their businesses from cyber threats. 

This year’s lineup is still being finalized, but past exhibitors include the world’s leading cyber security suppliers and the latest technologies and solutions. An exciting rapid-fire pitch showcase will feature at the conference, allowing companies to pitch their products and solutions to potential investors, partners, and customers. 

Insider Threat Summit

3 November 2022

Monterey, California

The Insider Threat Summit unites government agencies with private enterprises to discuss the problem of insider threats. This year’s conference will focus on vulnerabilities about cybersecurity challenges. Topics will include risk analysis and continuous evaluation or monitoring, AI and machine learning, economic espionage, counterintelligence, threat monitoring, and more. 

There you have it – our picks for the top 20 cybersecurity and supply chain security events of 2022. Whether you plan to attend in person or join some of these events virtually from the comfort of your own home, you’re sure to gain valuable insights into the latest cybersecurity developments. 

Waiting for that next conference and eager to learn more about automating your supply chain security? Request a demo

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